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Archive for category Pakistan Mujahid & Janbaz Force

Duty on Eid-A Pakistani Soldier’s Story! BY Fahad Malik

Duty on Eid-A Pakistani Soldier’s story!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fahad Malik

 

 

 

 

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Everyone is preparing for Eid. Eid-ul-Azha is now very close. Muslims all around the world are gathering to Makkah, for their Hajj, those who are selected by God, to visit his home. And those who were away and those who were not invited to Makkah, all are planning to visit their families, and go back to their homes. But the luxury of spending their Eids with families is for all except Us! Yes, I am a soldier who is deployed at NWA in ZarbEAzb, and this is going to be my second Eid without my family and away from home.

                  I am married, Happily married indeed, and now we have a 2 year old son, though I didn’t see him from last 6 months. Married, two years ago, and I had just two Eids with my family. Two with Family, and two without family. Whenever, it is such an occasion, and I am not home, I just spend my day in reminding myself those days, those occasions I spent with my family in the comfort of my home. Kitchen was the favorite place for me, where my wife and my mother were busy in preparing Haleem, Kheer, and Kabab’s, Tikka’s in case of Bari Eid.

                  Eid-ul-Azha is celebrated in remembrance of the great sacrifice by Prophet Ibrahim (PBUH), but with the progression of time, the essence of that sacrifice seems to have gotten lost. Yes, we forgot what Sunnat-e-Ibrahimi was, but right now, keeping the debate of Qurabani-becoming-fashion aside, I am talking about the Sacrifices, we have forgotten. Yes, The sacrifice of staying away from your own family to keep the rest of the country safe. The sacrifice of staying in camouflage all the day, when the rest of the country is busy in wearing new dresses. The sacrifice of bearing hundreds of bullets on your chest, when the rest of the country is busy in eating chest pieces? Those who are sitting on borders, those like me who are sitting in the hard areas, in the operating areas, on the Eid days, why do people forget them? Why not a single word about them, who postpone their Eid Leaves just to stay on duty?

                  Neither your politicians, nor your parliamentarians, sacrifice their sleep for your safety. It’s a soldier, who stays awake, to let you sleep peacefully. It’s a soldier, who shows selfless duty on these national “holidays”, just to make your holiday safe! When I was at PMA, my drill sergeant taught me, that there is not a single holiday for a soldier. I always thought that he is joking. But now, when I am here in the open sun, where we have terrorists around, now I believe that there is literally not a single holiday for a soldier. There are hundreds of Us, who are here in ZarbEAzb, and on Line of control, and on borders, but no one remembers them. Those who risk their lives in the treacherous mountains away from their families, they are the unsung heroes! This Eid, do remember them!

-Fahad Malik

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HUM TUMEH KABHI NAHIN BHULEN GAYE : A VIDEO TRIBUTE TO SONS OF PAKISTAN WHO WERE MARTYRED IN WAR ON TERROR

 

 

  

 

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Just give me my Aircraft
If I die in battle zone
Box me up & send me home
Put my medals on my chest
Tell my Mom I did my Best
Tell my nation not to cry
I was soldier born to die  … Officer Pakistan Air Force
 
 
..SENTIMENTS OF PAKISTANIS NEAR & FAR: DIL DIL PAKISTAN, JAAN, JAAN, PAKISTAN
 
Comments of  Retired Soldiers
 
I am sharing these pictures of our young Army, Navy, and Air Force Officers and Men who embraced Shahadat while safe guarding our beloved country,
fighting against terrorism.You will find a couple of views of my course mates including mine as well.
 
 
Thank you so much for sharing the photographs of Shaheed ‘s with me. I am truly shocked to see these many photographs. 
Being located so far away, I did not realize that so many young officers have already lost their lives for the defense of Pakistan.
I am sure that there must be many many more soldier/jawans who also lost their lives with these officers. 
 
May Almighty God give these shaheeds a place in heaven and their families strength to bear this loss. 
 
 
 

 

 

This is not the first time that we have lost wonderful young men defending Pakistan.On every call to duty our young and the spirited rose to the occasion and wrote chapters in bravery, leadership and comradeship under fire.

 

A Retired Soldier’s Thoughts

 
Since the day , I received this e-mail of yours, I have seen the pictures of our national heroes But something somewhere in my heart was boiling and all the time I tried to name it out but could not neither I could diagnose it that what is it all going there in my heart. At least it revealed to me that no doubt that I am a old man BUT not with a Dead Heart. There are mixed feeling of sadness , sorrow , grief but above all there was anger too .But unable to express my true feelings to convey. I am grateful to our dear friend Brig.Mehboob Qadir who has spoken my mind and I endorse the same. These heroes shall ever remain there in my heart and in my laptop till my eye sight fade out and my hands stop working to operate the lap top.

 

                        

Salute them – They gave their life for us..

  

 

 

 
 
 Captain Junaid Khan (Shaheed) of SSG . “Tamgha-e-Basalat”
 
 
TWO SHAHEEDS TOGETHER.. CAPT MUNEEB SHAHEED , CAPT. AMJAD SHAHEED. — 

 

 
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9qoxLbZW9io
 
 
Captain Najam Riaz (SSG) Shaheed

 
Major Umair Khan Bangash TAMGHA-i-BASALAT’ shaheed
 
Captain Bilal Zafar Shaheed..
 
Squadron Leader Masood Rizvi Shaheed. 

 
 
 
Captain Fasih Babar Shaheed Presented Guard of Honor. He got commissioned in Pakistan army in October 2007. He had a wife and a son whose age was just about one and a half year. His funeral prayers were being offered in pindi.

 
 
 
 
 
 
RECIEVING ROCKET ON CHEST IS NOT AN EASY JOB.THERE ARE ONLY FEW WHO GET THIS HONOUR. AND THEY ARE THOSE CHOSEN ONE WHO ALWAYS KEEP THEIR HONOUR AND DIGNITY SUPREME.THEY ARE THE REAL HEROES AND HEROES DIE YOUNG.BILLAL YOUR HEROIC ACT WILL ALWAYS BE REMEMBERED. AND WILL REMAIN A SOURCE OF MOTIVATION FOR US..
 
 
 
 
 
MAJOR SHAOIB
Who survived the Mi 17 crash in jan  before dying on 14 july 2012 crash. 

 

After the crash he pulled out 2 men who have both survived and walked to the ambulance before collapsing unconscious. Unable to open his eyes, he told his wife to take care of his mother and 2 daughters before he was evacuated to Kharian Army burn hospital. He asked about Amir, his co pilot and coursemate who didnt survive the crash. Multiple heart attacks, swellings and infections finaly took him from us. His heroic act of valor in saving his crew while he himself burned will be not be forgotten. ALlah bless him the highest place in jannat. 

 
 
 
LT Wajeeh Bangash Shaheed after getting rid of 7 militants got a sniper shot on his head and embraced Shahadat! 

 

 
 
 
 
Capt. Raja Farhan Ali Shaheed…

 
 
 
 
Capt. Mannan Shaheed with His Mother…
 
 
 
Lt Colonel Amir abbas Shaheed With his 2 cute angels Syed Khariq Abbas n Syeda Areeza Abbas…

 

 
capt zubair shaheed.(left)

 

 
capt babar shaheed

 

 
Captain Doctor Muhammad Ali khan (Shaheed)
 
Capt. Abdul Qadir Khan who embrace shahadat on 20th October.He was born in 1983.He joined Pakistan Army in 2003.

 
Capt. tariq,survived a IED attack in march 2009,died in feb 11 in ops bar
Lt. Taimoor Shah , S/O Ashfaq Hussain Shah
A valiant Son of 71 Baloch Regiment Belongs to Haider 118 ..Taimoor was born on 14 Aug 1986
He Embraced shahdat Near Kashmoor On Sep 23, 2009…

 
Capt Tariq Jamal Shaheed……

 

 
Lieutenant Yasir (Shaheed) 
 
Capt Mannan Shaheed
 
Captain Dr. Sharjeel has just embraced Shahadat in waana Waziristan.
 
LT. Ammad (Shaheed) 
 
Captain Hassan Abid Shaheed.
 
Captain Haider Nawaz Murawat 
 
Lieutenant Faiz Sultan Awan Shaheed 

 
Lt Atta Ur Rehman Shaheed

 
Amjad Razaq Shaheed SSG(N)

 
Capt. Rahman.SSG, Shaheed

Memorable pic of Ft. Lt. Ali Raza Tarar Shaheed.
Muhammad Bin Hassan, son of Captain Hassan Shaheed.
Born of June 10,2011. 4 months after Capt. Hassan embrace Shahadat.

 
Major Zia ul Haq Shaheed. Embrace Shahadat on 30th July ,

 
 
 
 
Cute Son of Captain Rashid Hakeem (Shaheed) 
Mohammad Rashid… 

Squadron Leader Muhammad Hussain shaheed… 
Got Martyred on 14 of november in the incident of JF thunder crashed at a hill near the garrison town of Attock, 65 kilometres northwest of Islamabad..
May his Soul Rest In Peace ..

 
PROUD SONS OF MOTHERLAND PAKISTAN. Major Mujahid and Captain Usman — Embrace SHAHADAT together on Salala checkpost defending Pak Sarzameen! 22 other soldiers who Embrace Shahahdat with them

 
 Captain Salman (Shaheed)

 
 
Lt. Atta Shaheed
 
Maj Zaka (shaheed) his daughter widow,  a son was born after he died.

 
 
 
 
 
Shaheeds in PAF Trainer Crash

 

One year Old Son of Major Muddasir Bajwa (Shaheed)
 
 
 
Son of Major Zahid Bari (Shaheed)

MAY GOD BLESS THEM ALL 

 

 
 

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BHAGHORA OF KARGIL NAWAZ SHARIF: Kargil was a big success for Pakistan: Musharraf

Kargil was a big success for Pakistan: Musharraf

 
 
 
 
Islamabad: Claiming that his 1999 Kargil operation was a “big success militarily”, former Pakistani president Pervez Musharraf has said that if the then prime minister Nawaz Sharif had not visited the US, the Pakistani Army would have “conquered” 300 square miles of India. 

He defended his action to launch the operation in Kargil in the wake of fresh allegations that he masterminded the intrusions. 

Referring to Lt Gen (retired) Shahid Aziz’s allegations that he had kept other military commanders in the dark about the operation, Musharraf said, “Telling everyone about it was not necessary at all”. 

He claimed Aziz had an “imbalanced personality” and had resorted to character assassination by making these accusations. 

 

“We lost the Kargil war, which was a big success militarily, because of (then premier) Nawaz Sharif…If he had not visited the US, we would have conquered 300 square miles of India,” Musharraf said in an interview with Express News channel. 

Though Pakistan had initially claimed mujahideen were responsible for occupying strategic heights along the Line of Control in early 1999, Musharraf later revealed in his autobiography ‘In The Line Of Fire’ that regular Army troops had participated in the operation. 

But Musharraf claimed the action in Kargil was a “localised” operation and not a major operation. 

“Kargil was just one of many sectors under a Major General stationed in Gilgit, (who was) in charge of the area. Exchange of fire was routine there,” he claimed. Musharraf said he would not go so far as to accuse former premier Nawaz Sharif of betrayal but his decision to withdraw from Kargil was a mistake. 

 

Unknown-2“Nawaz lost a political front which we had won militarily,” he claimed. 

The former general, who has been living in self-exile outside Pakistan since 2009, said the “prime consideration” for actions like the Kargil operation is security and secrecy. 

“So the Army leadership decides who is to be informed and when. As the operation progressed and the proper time arrived, a briefing of the corps commanders was held,” he said. 

Musharraf said he was “really astonished” that Aziz was writing about the events 10 years later. 

Blaming the nation at this juncture, as Aziz had done, seems to be “part of a conspiracy”, he claimed. 

“It was a tactical action that had a strategic importance in which no more than a few hundred persons were involved, but which engaged thousands on the Indian side and was of tremendous importance,” he claimed. 

Musharraf justified Pakistani casualties in the conflict, claiming the country lost only 270 men against India’s 1,600 soldiers. 

 
Courtesy
Press Trust of India
INDIAN VIEWPOINT: NEVER CALL A DEFEAT, A DEFEAT

Eyeball to eyeball   July 1999

India has to mask its initial intelligence failure by regaining the peaks regardless of heavy casualties. Both sides need a face-saving way out. Since early May there has been a see-saw military, political and diplomatic struggle between the two Subcontinental protagonists, Pakistan and India. Islamabad’s position has been that the guerrillas who have captured the heights overlooking the Drass-Kargil-Leh road, are Kashmiri freedom fighters struggling for their long-denied right of self-determination. 
 
 

India eventually decided, after examining the pros and cons of widening the conflict across the Line of Control (LoC) or even across the international border, on a strategy of containment within the narrower objective of regaining the Kargil heights. This narrower framework meant higher casualties on the Indian side because of the difficulty of traversing slopes against dug-in defenders where the terrain offers no cover.

New Delhi calculated that it does have the political will and military morale, despite the heavy casualties, and can sustain the cost in human and material terms. A near-consensus domestically and the willingness of the Indian military command to accept constraints allowed India to continue with an operation in which it suffered disproportionately heavy casualties.

With regard to Pakistan, the intriguing question is whether the Kargil heights seizure was part of the normal stepping up of guerrilla activity during summer, or whether it had more ambitious objectives. If it were the former, little can be added, except to mention in passing a failure of Indian intelligence. The guerrillas’ presence was only discovered by accident when two Indian army patrols happened to spot them. The true extent of the guerrilla presence did not sink in until the Indian army had carried out an aerial survey of the area, which revealed that between 400 to 700 guerrillas had seized the heights. This could have put them in a position in any future war to threaten the sole overland logistics link with the Indian forces deployed in Siachen, i.e. the Srinagar-Drass-Kargil-Leh road.

But the Kargil seizure could have other strategic objectives with military, political and diplomatic dimensions. Militarily, if the seizure could be maintained for a reasonable period of time and at least until winter sets in, it could open up possibilities of forcing either an Indian withdrawal from Siachen, or a trade-off between the Kargil heights and the Siachen Glacier.

Politically, it could reflect the impatience in Islamabad with lack of progress in bilateral discussions on Kashmir under the Lahore Declaration process after the fall of the BJP government in end-April. Despite the fact that Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee of India heads a caretaker government until elections are held in September-October, the hope may have been to force New Delhi back to the negotiating table in a serious mode. Diplomatically, since the bilateral process had not yielded results, an internationalisa-tion of the Kashmir issue may have been sought to bring it back onto the frontburner.

If we assume for the sake of argument that all or some of these objectives formed part of the Pakistani thrust into Kargil, or at least were taken on board once things hotted up on the Line of Control, we can examine the results achieved or likely to be achieved in the foreseeable future and then draw up a balance sheet of gains and losses.

Missing Kashmir for Kargil

Militarily, the inherent difficulty of holding on to the Kargil heights in the face of overwhelming firepower and numbers has become a key question as the battle drags on. India has weighed the costs of heavy casualties against the bigger costs of potentially adverse international intervention if the conflict is widened. It has relied on the political consensus to hold on to Kashmir no matter what the cost, which informs its domestic political spectrum (the weak and scattered chinks of rationality represented by liberal opinion notwithstanding). India’s slow but definite gains against the guerrillas have produced collateral pressures for a withdrawal of the guerrillas from what is turning into a suicidal mission.

The political timing of the Kargil seizure, if the idea was indeed to force New Delhi back to serious negotiations, could not have been worse. A caretaker government heading into an election was hardly likely to be in a position to negotiate, let alone offer any flexibility or concession on such a major issue. There has been speculation in the Indian press after the visit to Pakistan by the US emissary General Anthony Zinni regarding proposals purportedly from Islamabad for India to allow safe passage to the guerrillas, quoting the precedent of the Hazrat Bal shrine siege. Whether these reports hold any water or not is not known.

However, Western diplomatic pressure on Islamabad is mounting, especially after Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif’s visit to Washington DC and London, and these could take various forms, economic, political, diplomatic. The dependence of the Pakistani economy on the goodwill of the West, and particularly the US, to keep foreign fund flows going makes Pakistan that much more vulnerable to ‘persuasion’.

It goes without saying that such ‘persuasion’ seeks to maintain the status quo on Kashmir, while advocating peaceful negotiations. Pakistan’s experience indicates that retaining the status quo has always proved favourable to India. Any disturbance of New Delhi’s hold on Kashmir, even if partial or temporary, serves to refocus the attention of the global community on a long-neglected, festering wound. But in trying to disturb the status quo in its favour, the manner in which Pakistan pursues this tactical goal is crucial. This cannot happen by ignoring the ground reality.

The Pakistani army chief, General Pervez Musharraf, put his finger on the problem by describing Kargil as “a tactical, military issue”, while Kashmir as such was “a strategic, political” one. In other words, to see only the Kargil part of the picture represented by the Kashmir problem, is to miss the forest for the trees. However, in the present instance, Islamabad appears to have failed to persuade the global powers-that-be of the justness of this linkage. On the contrary, opinion seems to have hardened in the West that the status quo must be restored before diplomatic “business as usual” can be resumed.

Most thinking people in Pakistan are by now convinced that there is no (regular) military option to obtain a solution to Kashmir, particularly after both India and Pakistan have demonstrated their nuclear capability. The irregular military option (guerrilla war) faces considerable political and ideological disabilities, especially since the Kashmir guerrilla movement has acquired a fundamentalist hue over time. This does not appear to be sufficiently inspiring for large numbers of the Kashmiri people who are well known for their traditional religious tolerance. This despite continuing repression by the Indian military in Kashmir.

Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif has been castigated by the right-wing, religious, fundamentalist opinion for stating an obvious truth that without both India and Pakistan going beyond their “stated positions”, no solution to the Kashmir problem is possible. The hue and cry against him for saying that, particularly in the Urdu press, reflects the limitations which restrict the country’s political leadership. No flexibility, political or diplomatic, is allowed to any Pakistani leader to even explore some middle ground. Any such suggestion is treated as treason, betrayal, the worst kind of skullduggery. For such ideologically ‘pure’ elements, it is either all or nothing as far as Kashmir is concerned.

Before it is too late, sober heads must begin to ponder how much cloth we have remaining and how to cut it. Passion cannot replace cool calculation required for a strategic plan for peace. The Pakistani leadership must take into account a heavily dependent economic structure, an inability to rouse the world’s conscience beyond rhetoric, and the lack of a solid consensus across the

domestic political divide. The risk is that any attempt to work out a strategy based on the art of the possible would fall foul of Pakistan’s ideological hawks.

 

 
Reference

 

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