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Posts Tagged JUI(F)

MQM’S CAKE & MULLA DIESELS’S DELIVERY: Two Anti-Pakistan US Sponsored Political Gangs Rubbing Each Other’s Back

CONGRATULATIONS  MQM GOT THEIR PIECE OF CAKE 
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AT THE REQUEST OF MAULANA  FAZAL COMMONLY KNOWN AS
 
           ( MULLA DIESEL) 
 
MQM HAS DECIDED TO HOLD BACK THEIR CALL FOR RESIGNATION OF THEIR PARLIAMENTARIANS AND RESIGNATION OF PM.
 
OFF COURSE CAKE CONTAIN LOTS &LOTS OF SWEETS.
 
HOW CAN POOR MQM  WALAS RESIST TO DECLINE THE SWEETS. AFTER ALL. AS PER EX- CM RAISANI SWEETS ARE SWEETS. HOW CAN MQM BECOME A NA SHUKARA.
 
PIR SAHIB IN HIS LAST SPEECH HAD HINTED TO THOSE WHO MATTERED THAT HE NEVER TOOK A PIE OUT OF GOVERNMENT TREASURY.
 
THE PLEA IS RIGHTLY MADE AS ALL OTHER CHANNELS ARE BLOCKED BY — — USELESS BRITISH POLICE.
 
POOR PIR SAHIB IS WITHOUT SWEETS SINCE QUITE SOME TIME, HOW LONG YOU GUYS WANT HIM TO STARVE, SO THE ONLY OPTION LEFT WAS GOP.
 
GOP  HAS A GREAT CHARACTER, BIG HEART, SHOWN MAGNANIMITY AT THE COST PEOPLES MONEY, DECIDED TO OFFER SWEETS TO MQM IMMEDIATELY WITHOUT ANY DELAY AS THEY HAD EARLIER ACCOMMODATED OUR POOR 21 NO. JOURNALISTS AT THE TIME OF THEIR NEED WITH RS.10 MILLION EACH.  
PAKISTAN ZINDABAD, PAK KHIZANA ZINDABAD

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Voter fraud: 65% of votes in Balochistan were bogus in 2008 General Election

 

By Irfan Ghauri
Published: September 22, 2011

 


ECP and NADRA reveal staggering figures for 2008 general election.

ISLAMABAD: Balochistan had the highest rate of fake voters during the 2008 general election, according to findings from the Election Commission of Pakistan (ECP) and National Database and Registration Authority (NADRA).

Unknown-3A glance at statistics from the province do not reflect well on the electoral process. In Killa Abdullah there were total of 387,823 registered voters and only 70,820 could be verified. In Kech, of the 218,953 registered voters only 84,500 were legitimate. In Loralai there were 226,658 registered voters, of which a meagre 52,657 could be verified. Of Jaffarbabad’s 391,608 registered voters, only 98,919 were not bogus.

The legitimacy of our current government has been severely questioned by recent findings that almost half of the entries in voter lists at the last election were fake.

The startling facts emerged as the ECP and NADRA were preparing new voter lists based on computerised national identity cards (CNICs). Discrepancies emerged between the electoral rolls used for last general election and succeeding by-polls held so far.

(Read: Democratic process – Balochistan seeks quick completion of voters’ list)

The official documents, copies of which are available with The Express Tribune, reveal serious flaws in the electoral system used in the 2008 general election. Among the 81.2 million voters registered, 37 million were either ghost voters, multiple entries or the voter was registered without any authentic proof of identity. The figures for dubious entries were as follows: 65 per cent in Balochistan, 62 per cent in FATA, 54 per cent in Sindh, 43 per cent in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa and 41 per cent in Punjab.

The 2007 electoral rolls were an updated version of lists compiled by the ECP for elections held in the 90s and 2002.

Statistics from around the country are alarming. Larkana, the hometown of former prime minister Benazir Bhutto, had 484,727 fake entries against 240,762 genuine registered voters who could be verified. The town had a total of 725,489 registered voters.

images-1The district of Multan, from where Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gilani, former foreign minister Shah Mehmood Qureshi and Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz’s stalwart Makhdoom Javed Hashmi were elected to the National Assembly, had 1.16 million bogus entries out of a total 2.2 million registered voters.

Karachi had more seats than any other city in the national and provincial legislatures, and a total of 6.6 million registered voters. Only 3.9 million could be verified. A glaring 2.7 million entries had been fake.

Similarly, Lahore, Pakistan’s second largest city and capital of most populous province Punjab, had a total of 3.7 million registered voters. Among them 2.1 million have been declared genuine and the remaining 1.6 million could not be verified.

Islamabad, the capital and considered the most developed city in the country, was not free of electoral fraud. Out of the total 482,548 registered voters, 153,965 were bogus entries. Peshawar had a total of 1.2 million registered voters. Of these, 610,197, just over half, were fake. Quetta had a total of 652,799 registered voters. Among these, 323,837 could not be verified as genuine registered voters.

Unknown-20The findings make uneasy reading for the incumbent national and provincial legislatures. The electoral system has been uncovered as falling well short of fair democratic standards.

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AMB.ZAFAR HILALY’S OPINION: No time for mutiny

 
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The symbol of an Anglican bishop is a crook (a hooked staff); and that of an archbishop is a double cross. Coincidentally, that’s what many of the English used to feel about their clergy. “I never saw, heard nor read that the clergy were beloved in any nation where Christianity was the religion of the country”, said Swift. And he should have known – Swift was a high born Anglican priest (& writer).
 
Our feelings about the clergy are not very different. We too prefer to steer clear of them, except on unavoidable occasions namely, births, marriages and deaths. Even at Friday prayers some prefer to wait outside the mosque till the mullah has finished his sermon and only then rejoin the congregation.
 
That’s because we know our ‘priests’. We’ve had varieties of maulanas – ‘whisky’ and ‘diesel’ and ‘sandwich’ are just three examples. There have been others, like those who opposed the creation of Pakistan but on which, when it became a fait accompli, they scrambled aboard in search of lucre and office. Of course, there are those who were/are genuinely respected for their contribution to national life. Nevertheless, a straw poll suggests the public far prefers the mullah’s role be confined to leading prayers and performing religious rituals than governing, which is why religious political parties have never obtained more than a small share – 12 percent – of votes in elections and that only happened once.
 
But times are a changing. So overwhelming are the common man’s difficulties today, so dire his plight and so desperate his desire to find a way out that increasingly he is turning to religion, not only for protection against pain and suffering but also in the efficacy of the unforeseen, the miraculous and the extraordinary. Only God, he feels, can now rescue him. Hence, the mullah finds himself acting as an intercessor between man and God. And, as things go from bad to worse, it is not our politics that is becoming Islamised but Islam which is being politicised – and that’s a bane.
Qadri seeks to benefit from the public’s despair and their craving for a messiah. He avoided reference to religion in his Lahore speech on December 23, because he did not need to; consider he is a Shaikul Islam. Nevertheless, lest anyone forget, he dressed like a cleric even though his peculiar headgear was as foreign to our milieu as his English accent must have been to an Englishman. It looked like the Ottoman relic the Turkish clergy sported till Ataturk arrived on the scene and banished it.
 
Usually affectation in dress is an indication of a flaw in understanding and taken to the extreme it may be revealing of character and temperament. An aspect that was highlighted in the video shown on TV which revealed Qadri boasting that he had a major role to play in drafting the blasphemy law and persuading Ziaul Haq to accept it. If, indeed, he was proud of being the initiator of that law, as he said on video, why then deny it? Was it a concession to the feelings of his fellow Canadians who would have put him on an ‘extremist watch list’ if it were true? Besides, ‘if you cannot tell the people the truth about yourself you cannot tell it about other people.’
 
Qadri is hardly the paragon of virtue and rectitude that he is being made out to be. A high court judge of yore, Justice Akhtar Hussain, heading an enquiry commission investigating Qadri’s (false) accusations in 1990 that the Jamaat-e-Islami and IJI had tried to kill him had some damning words for Qadri. Justice Akthar Hussain said Qadri was fond of dreaming and then exploiting such dreams. The judge characterised his mental condition as “ailing”, adding “anything can be expected from such a person” (The News Dec 25, 2012). Considering that in his book Fatwa on Terrorism and Suicide Bombings, Qadri describes himself as, and I quote: “Shaikhul Islam Dr Muhammed Tahirul Qadri is a scholar and intellectual leader of extraordinary proportions. He is a living model of profound classical knowledge, intellectual enlightenment, practical wisdom, pure spirituality, love, harmony and humanism…”
 
It might be said of self praise, just as it is said of slander, that something always sticks if we praise ourselves fearlessly, provided the praise is not entirely shameful and ridiculous. But even then, there is no excuse for such lavish self praise. Blowing your own trumpet incessantly is a sickness and left untreated it stinks.
 
And frankly, phoniness suffused Qadri’s visit. The pre-arrival publicity, the VIP reception at the airport, the multitudes assembled to hear him speak, the military precision of his security guards, and his dress and demeanour seemed wholly contrived. Here was a controversial former politician being accorded a welcome befitting a national hero and with no expense spared.
The multitudes that had gathered to hear Qadri were a strange potpourri of people; among whom were rustic peasants struggling to open Nestle water bottles. One of them was attacking the wrong end of the bottle till someone produced what looked like a sickle and chopped the cap off.
 
We know our peasants. They are simple God fearing men, and true sons of the soil. Hence, I cannot imagine anything persuading them to come and listen to a lecture by a cleric on the intricacies of the constitution. Or, on second thoughts, I can – a handsome reward, the prodding of the local chaudhry and, who knows, a nod and a wink from the powers that be.
All sorts of theories are being bandied about for the stupefying, nay, miraculously large turnout. The trouble is that nobody readily believes in miracles, hence speculation was rife as to where the money came from and the kind of organisation that was able to paste handbills of his Lahore meeting even on a remote bridge in Karachi.
 
Those who are fastidious about knowing how money moves ridiculed Qadri’s boast that some of his followers were willing to sell their homes for the privilege of traipsing the world merely to hear him speak. And that Pakistanis even in relatively lowly positions abroad, “like drivers”, were contributing a thousand dollars each towards his cause. Having lived and travelled abroad for the greater part of my working life, I found no ‘drivers’ so well endowed or so willing to part with their hard earned money. Of course, the well off among Pakistanis living abroad do, but obviously not the poor.
We will learn all about that soon enough. And if the Qadri visit turns out to be a ploy to postpone elections then those who have been deceiving others, by denying there is a hidden hand behind it all, will really have only deceived themselves because the consequences could be grave and even fatal for the country’s future stability.
 
If Qadri is genuinely interested in bringing change in Pakistan and is indeed in favour of the constitutional path, as he claims, not withstanding his talk of revolution, he should renounce his Canadian citizenship, form his own party and get elected.
 
To stir the political pot at this sensitive juncture of our political calendar, and just when people were wondering whether the government had the strength left to somehow crawl past the finish line and hold peaceful elections, is unwise. To allow a controversial cleric the freedom democracy confers to hurt democracy, notwithstanding his dubious claims to the contrary, is foolish. However, to help and support him in his endeavour is folly. The need of the hour is unity not mutiny.
 

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COL.RIAZ JAFRI’S BYLINE: Qadri’s Quandary

Sensing danger to their political empires most political leaders especially the PML(NAWAZ), the PPP, the JUI (F) and ANP groups are in the forefront in castigating Maulana Tahir Qadri for his March for the Change. They question his dual nationality, his source of funding to the tune of Crores, his call for the Change at such a belated time and hurling personal attacks on him of all sorts.  I will not defend him for any of the accusations against him as he himself has done it many a time publicly and on media under the oaths of the highest order.

Whether he is a Saint or a Scoundrel doesn’t make a difference to me.  I am just concerned with what he says and demands, that is;  Clean and Honest Electoral System to give us good and honest people to elect from.  I sincerely hope and pray that our present political leaders shall not oppose such an Electoral System. My question to his ALL detractor is a simple one.  Do they want the candidates for the coming elections to be Honest, Sagacious, Non-profligate and Ameen or not?  If yes, then how to find one measuring up to the Articles 62 (f) and 63 of the constitution. One way of doing it could  be to ask the candidates to proffer the followings also along with their nomination forms to the ECP:

  1. thumb.php Assets Returns including of the spouse(s) and children
  2. Tax Return (fully paid)
  3. All Utility Bills (fully paid)
  4. Property(ies) Tax (fully Paid)
  5. Vehicle(s) Tokens (fully paid)
  6. Bank Statement(s)
  7. Bank Loan Statement, declaring that the candidate has neither gotten any Bank Loans ever written off nor has been a Bank Defaulter ever.
  8. Brief details of the litigations in the courts and their present status.
  9. A “Good Character Certificate” from at least 40 persons duly endorsed by the Khatib of the mosque of the area where he/she lives.
  10.  An affidavit by the candidate declaring that he/she or ANYONE else on his/her behalf has NOT paid anything in any way or in coin or kind to the Political Party or to anyone in the Party for securing the Party Nomination and Ticket.

 

By doing so most of the undesirable ones could be weeded out and we would have good and honest politicians to choose from.

 

 

Col. Riaz Jafri (Retd)
30 Westridge 1
Rawalpindi 46000
Pakistan
E.mail: jafri@rifiela.com

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