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Posts Tagged Incompetent Nawaz Sharif Govt

CPEC controversy…army’s failure By Ayaz Amir

 

 

 

 

 

 

China-Pakistan-Economic-Corridor-CPEC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CPEC controversy…army’s failure

By 

Ayaz Amir

January 12, 2016

 

 
 

Islamabad diary

It was a ‘game-changer’, we all gushed, destined to change the face of Pakistan. No one could mention the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor without breaking into superlatives. Actual details were hard to come by but the rhetoric was intoxicating.

This was before our genius for statesmanship kicked in. When it did we are finding out that instead of reaching for the stars we are managing to dig ourselves into another hole. The controversy over the CPEC is spiralling in such a manner that the Chinese embassy has taken the unprecedented step of issuing a statement urging all parties to “strengthen communication…and resolve differences properly.”

Our Chinese friends can be forgiven for feeling miffed. Here they are holding out the prospect of all these roads, highways and power projects and we are speaking in different tongues. Seeing our performance they are likely to dwell in their minds on the merits of a one-party state.

The main charge against the Sharifs is that they have hidden everything behind a veil of secrecy and are not being open about maps and finances. Every now and then the Punjab chief minister makes another thunderous announcement about game-changing. Press him for details or ask him to show the actual maps and the highway/motorway alignments and the industrial zones and beyond his wagging finger, and eyes aflame with passion, there is little to see.

I can bet that if parliamentarians and corps commanders are subjected to a test about what the CPEC is about nine out of ten will flunk it. When the State Bank governor confesses to not knowing anything about the money and the loans, terms and conditions and repayment schedules, we get an idea of the mess the federal government has managed to create around this issue…which is supposed to alter the alignment of the stars in our favour.

But we should be honest with ourselves. Was any of this unexpected? Was anyone really expecting that the Sharifs, the two of them who are running the civilian half of this country, would transcend their limitations and turn overnight into a Bismarck couple on the CPEC?

Here were elected leaders who couldn’t get the threat of terrorism right. They had not the heart to take on the Pakistani Taliban. They could take no decision on Karachi. It was the army which knocked sense into them and the army, on its own, which declared war on terrorism – both of the religious variety as in Fata, and the ‘secular’ variety as in Karachi. When the army had taken the decision, the civilians hurriedly clambered aboard the terrorism bandwagon. It is another matter that they now give the impression that the resolve all along was theirs.

Given this record on what grounds was anyone expecting that coming to the ‘game-changer’ the same civilians, the same leadership class would become statesmen: bring all the provinces together and get everyone to sing from the same score?

The army is managing the internal security front and overseeing foreign policy. Visiting foreign high-ups invariably call on the army chief because everyone understands where the locus of real power rests. The army is providing security for the CPEC and raising an entire division headed by a two-star general (from our own resources) for this purpose. Without this guarantee there would be no corridor and no Chinese money coming in.

So how come, when the army has its finger in every pie, when it is spread all over, when it is handling all key issues, when it came to this supreme ‘game-changer’, this khan of khans, this king of kings, it left everything to the higher wisdom and statesmanship of the Sharifs? It doesn’t add up, doesn’t make sense.

Let us not be hard on Heavy-mandate PM and whiz-kid Punjab CM. They are doing nothing unusual. This is how they have been conducting business and politics – it being hard to make out where the one ends and the other begins – for the last 30 years. When they look at the map of Pakistan they see Punjab. When they look at Punjab they see Lahore. When they see Lahore what rivets their attention the most are the roads leading to Raiwind.

Being industrialists and businessmen, that too on an industrial scale, when they conduct state business with other countries it is but natural, given their background, that one eye is fastened on their own interests. With both the PPP leadership and the PML-N leadership the lines between public and private interest are blurred. It was not always like this. Once upon a time politics and commerce used to run on separate lines. Alas, not any more. Perhaps as a country we are atoning for sins unexplained.

I am not making any of this up. All reasonably well-informed Pakistanis know all this. But to return to the mother of all questions: how come in our holy of holies, the Vatican we call the General Headquarters, was the CPEC, this supposed definer of our future, left to the tender mercies of the Sharifs?

Give the Sharifs credit at least for being consistent. They are treating the CPEC as if it was one of their sugar mills, a karkhana of the Ittefaq Group. Again they are hardly to blame. They are just being true to form. Only in this case the army decided not to exercise the system of ‘checks-and-balances’ it not only exercises in other fields but thinks it its birthright to do so. Why?

Why intrusive interference in every other corner, every other aspect of national life? Why benign neglect and masterly inactivity, leaving the present leadership to its devices, regarding the ‘game-changer’? Or are we to think the unthinkable, what should hardly be put into words, that the Punjab-centrism of the Sharif approach strikes a chord with the larger Punjabi-ism of what euphemistically, when we want to take cover, we refer to as the ‘establishment’?

The CPEC was supposed to bring Pakistan together…tie up its constituent units, the four provinces and Gilgit-Baltistan, in a tighter framework of communication and economic integration. The Raiwind approach to the CPEC is fanning the flames of inter-provincial discord. The Chinese are not at fault. They know their history of the Long March and the subtleties of Mao Zedong Thought. In what institute of Marxism-Leninism could they have learned the subtleties of Raiwind thought?

The politicians can’t clear up this mess. They could forge no consensus on terrorism. The army did it for them. The Sharifs are in the driving seat…they cannot resolve the growing controversy regarding the CPEC. The differences are too wide, the suspicions too deep, civilian incapacity too glaring. It is a particular gift of PML-N ministers that whenever any of them speaks on this issue he manages to fan the flames of suspicion higher.

It’s the army which has to take the lead, behind the scenes, discreetly…but firmly, knocking sense into the political leadership, the way it did over terrorism.

Let us host Saudi princes and read out soothing words to them. But let us understand that the CPEC controversy is more important for us than the row between Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Email: bhagwal63@gmail.com

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Pakistan ranks 172 in the World in Internet Download Speed Index

 

 

 

Pakistan ranks 172 in the World in Internet Download Speed Index

 
 
Household Download Index
 

cyberspace
Based on millions of recent test results from Speedtest.net, this index compares and ranks consumer download speeds around the globe. The value is the rolling mean throughput in Mbps over the past 30 days where the mean distance between the client and the server is less than 300 miles.
 
 

ALL COUNTRIES

Graph Period:
May 31, 2011 – Nov 29, 2013

 

1
Hong Kong70.78 Mbps
2
Singapore53.42 Mbps
3
Romania52.48 Mbps
4
South Korea47.71 Mbps
5
Sweden43.02 Mbps
6
Macau40.94 Mbps
7
Japan40.93 Mbps
8
Lithuania40.90 Mbps
9
Andorra39.70 Mbps
10
Netherlands38.67 Mbps
11
Taiwan37.73 Mbps
12
Latvia37.52 Mbps
13
Denmark35.20 Mbps
14
Switzerland34.87 Mbps
15
Iceland34.51 Mbps
16
Luxembourg33.37 Mbps
17
18
Bulgaria29.06 Mbps
19
Belgium28.01 Mbps
20
Norway26.82 Mbps
21
Finland26.22 Mbps
22
France24.79 Mbps
23
Portugal24.15 Mbps
24
United Kingdom23.69 Mbps
25
Czech Republic23.28 Mbps
26
Germany23.25 Mbps
27
Liechtenstein23.10 Mbps
28
Estonia23.08 Mbps
29
Hungary22.91 Mbps
30
Uruguay21.78 Mbps
31
Ukraine20.84 Mbps
32
United States20.72 Mbps
33
Malta20.31 Mbps
34
Russia20.19 Mbps
35
Austria20.08 Mbps
36
Slovakia19.51 Mbps
37
Spain19.06 Mbps
38
Canada18.95 Mbps
39
Israel18.83 Mbps
40
Aland Islands18.55 Mbps
41
Ireland17.38 Mbps
42
New Zealand17.02 Mbps
43
Mauritius16.34 Mbps
44
China16.31 Mbps
45
Poland16.24 Mbps
46
47
Slovenia14.72 Mbps
48
Monaco14.34 Mbps
49
Australia14.30 Mbps
50
Georgia14.08 Mbps
51
Kazakstan14.03 Mbps
52
Mongolia13.88 Mbps
53
Isle of Man13.76 Mbps
54
Jersey13.74 Mbps
55
56
Thailand13.21 Mbps
57
Vietnam12.84 Mbps
58
Chile12.74 Mbps
59
Tajikistan11.82 Mbps
60
Faroe Islands11.71 Mbps
61
Aruba11.45 Mbps
62
Mexico11.44 Mbps
63
Curacao11.43 Mbps
64
Macedonia11.23 Mbps
65
66
Madagascar10.72 Mbps
67
Cayman Islands10.54 Mbps
68
Armenia10.19 Mbps
69
Saudi Arabia10.15 Mbps
70
Guernsey10.08 Mbps
71
Namibia9.93 Mbps
72
Turkey9.52 Mbps
73
Kyrgyzstan9.37 Mbps
74
Brazil9.28 Mbps
75
Puerto Rico9.20 Mbps
76
Bahamas9.16 Mbps
77
Qatar9.01 Mbps
79
Grenada8.65 Mbps
80
Belarus8.45 Mbps
81
Guam8.18 Mbps
82
Cyprus8.17 Mbps
83
Serbia8.03 Mbps
84
Greece8.00 Mbps
85
Lesotho7.54 Mbps
86
Bahrain7.30 Mbps
87
San Marino7.28 Mbps
88
Rwanda7.17 Mbps
89
Kuwait7.11 Mbps
91
Italy7.01 Mbps
92
Reunion6.92 Mbps
93
Senegal6.80 Mbps
94
Gibraltar6.76 Mbps
96
New Caledonia6.70 Mbps
97
Bermuda6.69 Mbps
98
Croatia6.67 Mbps
99
DR Congo6.47 Mbps
100
Montenegro6.32 Mbps
101
Mali6.18 Mbps
102
Albania5.94 Mbps
103
Cape Verde5.91 Mbps
104
Ecuador5.87 Mbps
106
Colombia5.85 Mbps
107
Barbados5.74 Mbps
108
109
Panama5.64 Mbps
110
Fiji5.55 Mbps
111
Saint Lucia5.47 Mbps
112
Jamaica5.45 Mbps
113
Argentina5.41 Mbps
114
Nigeria5.22 Mbps
115
Oman5.19 Mbps
116
117
Greenland5.13 Mbps
118
Malaysia4.94 Mbps
119
Ghana4.80 Mbps
120
Azerbaijan4.79 Mbps
121
Laos4.78 Mbps
122
Cambodia4.71 Mbps
123
Zimbabwe4.66 Mbps
124
Nepal4.63 Mbps
125
Bhutan4.53 Mbps
127
Martinique4.35 Mbps
128
Morocco4.31 Mbps
129
Nicaragua4.29 Mbps
130
Tanzania4.22 Mbps
131
India4.21 Mbps
132
Haiti4.17 Mbps
133
Myanmar4.15 Mbps
134
South Africa4.14 Mbps
135
136
Uganda4.04 Mbps
137
Kenya4.00 Mbps
140
Libya3.80 Mbps
141
Peru3.79 Mbps
142
Honduras3.78 Mbps
143
Paraguay3.72 Mbps
144
Mauritania3.71 Mbps
145
Iraq3.69 Mbps
146
Angola3.52 Mbps
147
Guadeloupe3.46 Mbps
148
149
Belize3.38 Mbps
150
Costa Rica3.33 Mbps
151
Indonesia3.33 Mbps
152
Gabon3.31 Mbps
153
Seychelles3.30 Mbps
154
Suriname3.25 Mbps
155
Maldives3.21 Mbps
156
Anguilla3.15 Mbps
157
Guatemala3.15 Mbps
158
Zambia3.13 Mbps
159
Mozambique3.11 Mbps
160
Jordan2.95 Mbps
161
Tunisia2.93 Mbps
162
163
Philippines2.90 Mbps
164
165
El Salvador2.84 Mbps
166
Lebanon2.73 Mbps
167
Bangladesh2.69 Mbps
168
Dominica2.68 Mbps
169
170
Uzbekistan2.53 Mbps
172
 Pakistan2.31 Mbps
173
174
Egypt2.17 Mbps
175
Botswana2.14 Mbps
176
Swaziland2.14 Mbps
177
Venezuela2.10 Mbps
178
Sudan1.84 Mbps
179
Bolivia1.73 Mbps
180
Algeria1.54 Mbps
181
Gambia1.50 Mbps
182
183
Benin1.31 Mbps
184
Malawi1.16 Mbps
185
Afghanistan1.13 Mbps
186
Burkina Faso0.89 Mbps

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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