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Posts Tagged German Nazism Below surface

UGLY HISTORICAL GERMAN BIGOTRY: Angela Merkel: Germany will become Islamic State!

Unknown-17Angela Merkel: Germany will become Islamic State!

Posted by EU Times on Sep 21st, 2010 

 

There has been a great influx of Israeli Jews welcomed to Germany at the invitation of the Merkel Government.  Does that make Germany a Jewish State! Please Read the Article below

 http://www.jweekly.com/article/full/8761/influx-of-soviet-jews-prompting-disputes-in-germany/

Chancellor Angela Merkel said that Germans have failed to grasp how Muslim immigration has transformed their country and will have to come to terms with more mosques than churches throughout the countryside, according to the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung daily.

“Our country continues to change, and integration is also the task for society to deal with immigrants,” Ms. Merkel told the daily newspaper. “For years we’ve been deceiving ourselves about this. Mosques, for example, are going to be a more prominent part of our cities than they were before.”

Germany, with a population of 4-5million Muslims, has been divided in recent weeks by a debate over remarks by the Bundesbank’s Thilo Sarrazin, who argued Turkish and Arab immigrants were failing to integrate and were swamping Germany with a higher birth rate.

The Chancellor’s remarks represent the first official acknowledgment that Germany, like other European countries, is destined to become a stronghold of Islam.

In France 30% of children age 20 years and below are Muslims. The ratio in Paris and Marseilles has soared to 45%. In southern France there are more Mosques than churches.

The situation within the United Kingdom is not much different. In last 30 years, the Muslim population there has climbed from 82,000 to 2.5 millions. Presently, there are over 1000 mosques throughout Great Britain – – many of which were converted from churches.

In Belgium, 50% newborns are Muslims and reportedly its Islamic population hovers around 25%. A similar statistic holds true for The Netherlands.

It’s the same story in Russia where one in five inhabitants are Muslim.

 

Posted by EU Times on Sep 21st, 2010 

 

 

 

 

Chancellor Angela Merkel said that Germans have failed to grasp how Muslim immigration has transformed their country and will have to come to terms with more mosques than churches throughout the countryside, according to the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung daily.

“Our country continues to change, and integration is also the task for society to deal with immigrants,” Ms. Merkel told the daily newspaper. “For years we’ve been deceiving ourselves about this. Mosques, for example, are going to be a more prominent part of our cities than they were before.”

Germany, with a population of 4-5million Muslims, has been divided in recent weeks by a debate over remarks by the Bundesbank’s Thilo Sarrazin, who argued Turkish and Arab immigrants were failing to integrate and were swamping Germany with a higher birth rate.

The Chancellor’s remarks represent the first official acknowledgment that Germany, like other European countries, is destined to become a stronghold of Islam.

In France 30% of children age 20 years and below are Muslims. The ratio in Paris and Marseilles has soared to 45%. In southern France there are more Mosques than churches.

The situation within the United Kingdom is not much different. In last 30 years, the Muslim population there has climbed from 82,000 to 2.5 millions. Presently, there are over 1000 mosques throughout Great Britain – – many of which were converted from churches.

In Belgium, 50% newborns are Muslims and reportedly its Islamic population hovers around 25%. A similar statistic holds true for The Netherlands.

It’s the same story in Russia where one in five inhabitants are Muslim.

 

Influx of Soviet Jews prompting disputes in Germany

by DANIEL DAGAN, Jewish Telegraphic Agency

 

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BERLIN — The influx of Jewish immigrants from the former Soviet Union into Germany is causing some fierce power and legal struggles — some of which are landing in German courts.

In some cases, the disputes have revolved around the Jewishness of the newcomers, but the main conflicts seem to center around the effects that absorbing the newcomers is having on the decision-making process in established German Jewish communities and in the election of Jewish officials.

The population of Germany’s Jewish community has more than doubled — to over 60,000 — in recent years as a result of a large wave of Russian immigrants.

German Jews, like most of European Jewry, are members of official local communities that are legally registered.

In the city of Hanover, for example, local Jewish activists accused Michael Fuerst, the longtime chairman of the community in the state of Lower Saxony, of relying on votes from non-Jewish newcomers to secure his position. The activists even questioned Fuerst’s Jewish origins.

In the end, a court decided several months ago to support Fuerst’s position and to re-establish him both as a community member and as the leader in the state.

In another more recent case, a group of newcomers from the former Soviet Union was excluded from the Potsdam community. The group, which calls itself the Association of Immigrants in the State of Brandenburg, challenged the exclusion and maintained that it was the only legitimate representative of the Jewish community there.

The established community’s chairman, Alexander Kogan, said the newcomers were excluded because they were not permanent residents of Brandenburg .

The immigrant group’s activists told the state government, local banks and other institutions that they were the only legitimate representatives of the community.

But a German court ruled earlier this month that the group of newcomers could not portray themselves as such.

The court’s decision has not ended the conflict. A lawyer representing the group has said he would explore the possibility of an appeal.

Another option for the immigrants, experts say, would be to register as a separate Jewish community in Brandenburg.

Non-Jewish residents of Potsdam can hardly understand why German courts have to deal with the burden of resolving the ongoing power struggle within the local Jewish community. “This is a very unfortunate situation,” a town official said, adding, “We would prefer not to be involved in this matter.”

For more JTA stories, go to: http://www.jta.org

 

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