Record shows Abbottabad Commission was penetrated by CIA

Record shows Abbottabad Commission was penetrated by CIA
Umar Cheema
Friday, August 02, 2013

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ISLAMABAD: A mind-blowing detail has emerged from the internal correspondence of NGO Save the Children disclosing its infiltration into the Abbottabad Commission to save its skin following allegations of the CIA’s penetration into the NGO in a hunt for Osama bin Laden through Dr Shakil Afridi, now under arrest in Peshawar.

 

“Some of us suspected that the khakis had access to the record and receive daily updates but never realised an NGO had infiltrated too,” said an official privy to the Commission’s working.
The leaked communication indicates that Lt Gen (retd) Nadeem Ahmed, an unofficial representative of the Army and ISI in the Commission, was allegedly cultivated by Save the Children who would offer him ‘how-to-do’ bailout advice, even sharing details about the internal politics of the Commission and classified record, something in radical contradiction to his reputation as a thorough professional and a man of integrity.
He briefed the deputy country director of Save the Children, according to the email, about the views of different members, staunch opposition from a panel colleague, Ashraf Jehangir Qazi, resulting in his dissenting note on the NGO and other institutions, and Gen (retd) Nadeem’s plan to effectively counter this note in collaboration with Justice (R) Javed Iqbal, the Chairman.
Another member, Abbas Khan, was neither willing to sign the report in its current shape, discloses email record, nor wanted to put a dissenting note hence decided to prolong his stay in the US where he went on the ‘pretext of medical ground’.
More alarmingly, the NGO was granted access to the Commission’s report well before it was sent to the prime minister. Save the Children had uninterrupted access to the four drafts prepared in June 2012 by the members including the chairman, email record available with The News indicates. All favours granted to Save the Children on behalf of the Commission were in clear breach of public trust raising question marks about the integrity of the members.
The chairman of the NGO, Save the Children, was contacted by The News. He initially agreed to meet but later stopped taking calls and did not respond to messages sent to him.Nadeem also felt confident, the email record shows, that he would be able to convince the panel with the answers given by the NGO and urge his colleagues to go by the facts presented by Save the Children instead of believing on the contents of Afridi’s statement.

Indo Israel

 

 

Gen (R) Nadeem also advised the NGO, an email of the country director reads, to fight the expulsion of our expatriate as otherwise the ISI would move quickly to close down the country programme before the Commission report comes out.
The NGO has neither denied the email record and the contents it carried (when shown by The News for seeking version) nor offered specific comments but that: “Our assistance to the Abbottabad Commission and its members including Gen Nadeem was within the legal parameters and Abbottabad Commission mandate to find facts.”
Nadeem was not available for comments, however, his close aide termed the allegations as utterly “rubbish and non-sense” when comments were sought after showing the email record
A transcript of internal wrangling: Muhammad Hassan Noor Saadi, deputy country director of Save the Children, met Gen (R) Nadeem on November 20, 2012 that followed his email to four senior colleagues. The report was primarily compiled by ‘our friend’, his email reads, and was endorsed by the Chairman but one of the members, Ashraf Qazi, was not in agreement with them. He wrote a dissenting note criticising Chairman Justice (R) Javed Iqbal and Gen (R) Nadeem ‘for being soft on certain institutions (including Save the Children).’
The Commission could not issue the report with that note and therefore now they are working on developing counter arguments on the note, read the email. The Commission needs to have a lot of comments removed from the note before it is in a shape that allows the report to be shared, the email continues, otherwise it can jeopardize the integrity of the members of the Commission. Justice (R) Javed Iqbal and Gen (R) Nadeem ‘have to work extra hard to factually prove a lot of things wrong that this third member is referring to,’ read the email of deputy country director. The email then explained the position of the fourth member, Abbas Ali Khan, absent from discussion. He is not willing to sign the report in the current shape, reads Hassan’s email, but also does not want to put in a note of dissent and therefore continues to prolong his stay in the US where he went on the pretext of treatment. As a way forward, the email continues, the two members will work with the third member (Ashraf Qazi) and try to come to a point where the note is significantly reduced and numbers of comments are taken out of the report.
Gen (R) Nadeem’s advisory role of the NGO: The email also brings to light his role as adviser to the NGO. To a question that what Save the Children should do, Nadeem advised the deputy country director to build relationship and confidence with the Ministry of Interior and Economic Affairs Division. “It would take few months for you to be back to complete normalcy,” Gen (R) Nadeem advised.
In another email generated on August 29, 2012, David Wright, the country director, wrote that ‘on my instructions Hassan asked Gen (R) Nadeem to give an honest assessment as to what he thinks our chances are of surviving this.’ Gen (R) Nadeem replied that he felt confident regarding the answers we (NGO) will give to the questions proposed, ‘he could convince the other commission members to go with the fact rather than the content of Afridi’s statement.’ Gen (R) Nadeem also advised to fight the expulsion of our expatriates, Wrights email continued. “He felt if we did not do this and the expats left, the ISI would then move quickly to close down the country programme before the Commission report comes out.”
Report draft shared with the NGO: Wright’s another email indicates that the draft was shared more than once with the NGO. Referring to a meeting of two senior officers of Save the Children with Gen (R) Nadeem, the country director said they were shown the report written by the Chairman of the Commission. The email said there were four versions of the report in June 2012 and these were reduced to two in August that year. However, they have reservations about the latest version shared in August as ‘the report which was originally thought to be our saviour, will be the tool for this expulsion.’ We will do our best, the email reads, to work ‘with our friends and try and get our responses in before the report is finalised.’

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As received…….
The first leak is an email, sent by Hassan Saadi, which he sent after meeting a member of the Abbottabad commission, who he refers to as a friend (Lt.Gen. (Retd) Nadeem Ahmed). This is one of the most revealing and damning piece of evidence about how Save the Children tried to infiltrate Abbottabad Commission and influence the nature of the final report.

Muhammad Noor, Hassan Saadi – Former DCD Emergencies, Pakistan – Currently out of Pakistan.
Krift, Tom – Vice President, Strategic Operations
Khan, Amanullah – DCD Program Implementation, Pakistan – Currently out of country.
Aleem Afnan – Director Security, Pakistan – Currently out of country.
Novel Mike – Regional Director, South & Central Asia

From: Muhammad Noor, Hassan Saadi (Hassan.Noor@savethechildren.org)
Sent: Tue 11/20/12 4:30 PM
To: Novell, Mike (SCI) (mike.novell@savethechildren.org); Krift, Tom (tkrift@savechildren.org); Khan, Amanullah (Amanullah.Khan@savethechildren.org)
Cc: Aleem, Afnan (afnan.aleem@savethechildren.org)
Hi All,

Today I had a brief meeting with our friend and following are some of the key points discussed

– The report primarily was compiled by our friend in the end and was endorsed by the chairman after incorporating the feedback that chairman had. However, one of the member (former ambassador) was not in agreement with the two members and said that after reviewing he might write a note of dissent. Unfortunately, his brother passed away in late October and therefore he was away and unavailable and after couple of weeks he started writing the note.

– The two members were excepting a short note of dissent that excluded Save the Children. However, few days back they received a note of dissent that in itself is a full report as it is a 73 pager note.

– Legally speaking, if commission wanted to issue the report they were bound to include the note. However, the note of dissent is a very strong one and is a full report almost. Very importantly, the note of dissent criticizes the two panel members were being soft on certain institutions (including Save the Children)

– The commission simply could not issue the report with that note and therefore now they are working on developing counter arguments on the note; however, it is taking them a lot of time and so far they have reached to just 16 pages.

– The commission needs to have a lot of comments removed from the note before it is in a shape that the report could be shared otherwise it can jeopardize the integrity of the members of commission. The third member is being very staunch in his ideas and not willing to change his stance and therefore the other two members have to work extra hard to factually prove wrong a lot of things that this third member is saying.

– With regards to Save the Children, the note says that CIA was working through Save the Children and had its operatives embedded in the organization. The Haripur house was taken to collect the DNA residue to continue looking for the trail of the deceased. Once that job was done, the house was vacated. Afridi’s statement, though might be inconsistent, also indicates the same thing that Save the Children is working on behalf of CIA

– The fourth member of the commission (Abbas Ali Khan) also is not content with the report, but rather coming with a note, has decided to stay in US, that he went to on pretext of medical grounds. He is not willing to sign the report in the current shape but also does not want to put in a note of dissent and therefore continues to prolong his stay in US.

– With these two members out, commission is no position to submit the report to the government.

– As a way forward, the two members will work with the third member and try to come to a point where the note is significantly reduced and number of comments are taken out from the report. This very well take some time and if all goes well then commission might be able to submit the report by next month. However, with current contents, it might never be published because the note of dissent talks about number of very sensitive issues very openly that cannot be shared

– To my question on so what Save the Children should do in this case? His reply was, that we need to work with MOI and EAD to build relationships and confidence. It would take few months for Save the Children to be back to complete normalcy. His opinion was that it might take 5 to 8 months for that to happen.

Best

Muhammad Hassan Noor Saadi | Deputy Country Director, Emergencies | Save the Children | House 3, Street 25, F-7/2, Islamabad | hassan.noor@savethechildren.org | Office: +92 51 2609601-9| Mobile: +92 300 8509351 | Skype: hassansaadi76
______________________

Now read this…………..

Record shows Abbottabad Commission was penetrated by CIA
http://www.thenews.com.pk/Todays-News-13-24543-Record-shows-Abbottabad-Commission-was-penetrated-by-CIA

Umar Cheema
Friday, August 02, 2013
From Print Edition

ISLAMABAD: A mind-blowing detail has emerged from the internal correspondence of NGO Save the Children disclosing its infiltration into the Abbottabad Commission to save its skin following allegations of the CIA’s penetration into the NGO in a hunt for Osama bin Laden through Dr Shakil Afridi, now under arrest in Peshawar.

“Some of us suspected that the khakis had access to the record and receive daily updates but never realised an NGO had infiltrated too,” said an official privy to the Commission’s working.

The leaked communication indicates that Lt Gen (retd) Nadeem Ahmed, an unofficial representative of the Army and ISI in the Commission, was allegedly cultivated by Save the Children who would offer him ‘how-to-do’ bailout advice, even sharing details about the internal politics of the Commission and classified record, something in radical contradiction to his reputation as a thorough professional and a man of integrity.

He briefed the deputy country director of Save the Children, according to the email, about the views of different members, staunch opposition from a panel colleague, Ashraf Jehangir Qazi, resulting in his dissenting note on the NGO and other institutions, and Gen (retd) Nadeem’s plan to effectively counter this note in collaboration with Justice (R) Javed Iqbal, the Chairman.

Another member, Abbas Khan, was neither willing to sign the report in its current shape, discloses email record, nor wanted to put a dissenting note hence decided to prolong his stay in the US where he went on the ‘pretext of medical ground’.

More alarmingly, the NGO was granted access to the Commission’s report well before it was sent to the prime minister. Save the Children had uninterrupted access to the four drafts prepared in June 2012 by the members including the chairman, email record available with The News indicates. All favours granted to Save the Children on behalf of the Commission were in clear breach of public trust raising question marks about the integrity of the members.

The chairman of the NGO, Save the Children, was contacted by The News. He initially agreed to meet but later stopped taking calls and did not respond to messages sent to him.Nadeem also felt confident, the email record shows, that he would be able to convince the panel with the answers given by the NGO and urge his colleagues to go by the facts presented by Save the Children instead of believing on the contents of Afridi’s statement.

Gen (R) Nadeem also advised the NGO, an email of the country director reads, to fight the expulsion of our expatriate as otherwise the ISI would move quickly to close down the country programme before the Commission report comes out.

The NGO has neither denied the email record and the contents it carried (when shown by The News for seeking version) nor offered specific comments but that: “Our assistance to the Abbottabad Commission and its members including Gen Nadeem was within the legal parameters and Abbottabad Commission mandate to find facts.”

Nadeem was not available for comments, however, his close aide termed the allegations as utterly “rubbish and non-sense” when comments were sought after showing the email record

A transcript of internal wrangling: Muhammad Hassan Noor Saadi, deputy country director of Save the Children, met Gen (R) Nadeem on November 20, 2012 that followed his email to four senior colleagues. The report was primarily compiled by ‘our friend’, his email reads, and was endorsed by the Chairman but one of the members, Ashraf Qazi, was not in agreement with them. He wrote a dissenting note criticising Chairman Justice (R) Javed Iqbal and Gen (R) Nadeem ‘for being soft on certain institutions (including Save the Children).’

The Commission could not issue the report with that note and therefore now they are working on developing counter arguments on the note, read the email. The Commission needs to have a lot of comments removed from the note before it is in a shape that allows the report to be shared, the email continues, otherwise it can jeopardize the integrity of the members of the Commission. Justice (R) Javed Iqbal and Gen (R) Nadeem ‘have to work extra hard to factually prove a lot of things wrong that this third member is referring to,’ read the email of deputy country director. The email then explained the position of the fourth member, Abbas Ali Khan, absent from discussion. He is not willing to sign the report in the current shape, reads Hassan’s email, but also does not want to put in a note of dissent and therefore continues to prolong his stay in the US where he went on the pretext of treatment. As a way forward, the email continues, the two members will work with the third member (Ashraf Qazi) and try to come to a point where the note is significantly reduced and numbers of comments are taken out of the report.

Gen (R) Nadeem’s advisory role of the NGO: The email also brings to light his role as adviser to the NGO. To a question that what Save the Children should do, Nadeem advised the deputy country director to build relationship and confidence with the Ministry of Interior and Economic Affairs Division. “It would take few months for you to be back to complete normalcy,” Gen (R) Nadeem advised.

In another email generated on August 29, 2012, David Wright, the country director, wrote that ‘on my instructions Hassan asked Gen (R) Nadeem to give an honest assessment as to what he thinks our chances are of surviving this.’ Gen (R) Nadeem replied that he felt confident regarding the answers we (NGO) will give to the questions proposed, ‘he could convince the other commission members to go with the fact rather than the content of Afridi’s statement.’ Gen (R) Nadeem also advised to fight the expulsion of our expatriates, Wrights email continued. “He felt if we did not do this and the expats left, the ISI would then move quickly to close down the country programme before the Commission report comes out.”

Report draft shared with the NGO: Wright’s another email indicates that the draft was shared more than once with the NGO. Referring to a meeting of two senior officers of Save the Children with Gen (R) Nadeem, the country director said they were shown the report written by the Chairman of the Commission. The email said there were four versions of the report in June 2012 and these were reduced to two in August that year. However, they have reservations about the latest version shared in August as ‘the report which was originally thought to be our saviour, will be the tool for this expulsion.’ We will do our best, the email reads, to work ‘with our friends and try and get our responses in before the report is finalised.’

 

 

Headquarters: Fort Meade, Md.

Mission: The main functions of the NSA are signals intelligence — intercepting and processing foreign communications, cryptology — cracking codes, and information assurance. IA is, put simply: preventing foreign hackers from getting secret information.

Budget: Classified. Some estimate the NSA is actually the largest intelligence organization in the world — three times the size of the CIA. The headquarters alone takes up 6.3 million square feet — around the same size as the Pentagon — with 112 acres of parking spaces, reports the Washington Post.

The Defense Intelligence Agency works to understand what foreign militaries will do before they do it.

The Defense Intelligence Agency works to understand what foreign militaries will do before they do it.

DIA

The DIA was established in 1961 with the goal of sharing information collected by the major military intelligence outfits (such as Army or Marine Corps Intelligence). More recently, the DIA has been expanding its overseas spy network to collect first-hand intelligence.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: The DIA serves as the lead intelligence agency for the Dept. of Defense, coordinating analysis and collection of intelligence on foreign militaries, in addition to surveillance and reconnaissance operations. The DIA is the common link between military and national intelligence agencies.

Budget: Classified. The DIA does not reveal budget information, although they do say they have more than 16,500 men and women working for them and are under DoD and congressional oversight.

The State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research provides diplomats the necessary tools for effective foreign policy.

The State Department's Bureau of Intelligence and Research provides diplomats the necessary tools for effective foreign policy.

REUTERS/Lucas Jackson

The State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research (INR) has ties to the Office of Strategic Services from World War II, but was transferred to State after the war. INR now reports directly to the Secretary of State, harnessing intelligence from all sources and offering independent analysis of global events and real-time insight.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: This agency serves as the Secretary of State’s primary advisor on intelligence matters, and gives support to other policymakers, ambassadors, and embassy staff.

Budget: $49 million in 2007, according to documents obtained by FAS.

Air Force Intelligence provides reconnaissance for US ground troops.

Formerly known as the Air Intelligence Agency, the agency is now known as the Air Force ISR — Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance. Air Force intelligence was established in 1948 to get information to troops on the ground, and most recently, the ISR has collected that intelligence from aerial drones.

Headquarters: Lackland Air Force Base, Texas

Mission: Air Force ISR collects and analyzes intelligence on foreign nations and hostile forces, both in and out of combat zones. They also conduct electronic and photographic surveillance, and provide weather and mapping data to troops in the field.

BudgetUnknown. The budget of ISR apparently falls under the Air Force’s Operation & Maintenance budget, which includes other areas outside of the agency’s scope such as flying operations and logistics. That number for 2012, however, was just over $46 million.

The FBI’s National Security Branch oversees counterterrorism and intelligence gathering.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Security Branch (NSB) was established in 2005, combining resources that include counterterrorism, counter-intelligence, weapons of mass destruction, and intelligence under a single FBI leader.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: Formed after 9/11 and the Iraq WMD commission — when intelligence agencies were not sharing data with each other — the NSB integrates intel on national security and criminal threats from a variety of sources that are often intertwined in order to protect U.S. interests.

Budget: Total FBI budget was approximately $8.1 billion in 2012, which included an increase of $119 million “to enhance our counterterrorism, computer intrusions, and other programs,” according to their website.

Army Intelligence and Security Command offers essential intel to troops on the battlefield.

Army intelligence has been around since spies worked for the Continental Army in 1775, but the U.S. Army’s Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM) was established in 1977 to become the major unifying command of army intelligence.

Headquarters: Fort Belvoir, Va.

Mission: INSCOM provides commanders on the ground with information they may need on the battlefield: intercepted enemy radio communications, maps, ground imagery, and information on force structure and numbers.

Budget: Unknown. The total military intelligence budget was $21.5 billion in 2012.

The Department of Energy, Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence gathers information on foreign nuclear weapons.

Surprisingly, the Energy Department even has an intelligence service. The Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence focuses on technical intelligence on nuclear weapons and nonproliferation, nuclear energy (especially foreign), and energy security. 

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: The Dept. of Energy doesn’t have the ability to conduct foreign intelligence, instead relying on information passed to them by other agencies (such as the CIA or NSA). If it involves weapons of mass destruction, the DoE offers up the analytical expertise.

Budget: Unknown. Like other government budgets, the intelligence activity is not specifically mentioned, although it may fall under “Atomic Energy Defense Activities” which had a total budget of more than $16 billion in 2012.

Coast Guard Intelligence provides information on maritime security and homeland defense.

Coast Guard Intelligence provides information on maritime security and homeland defense.

flikr/U.S. Coast Guard

Alaskan Coast Guard members pictured in a 2009 exercise

Coast Guard Intelligence (CGI) was formed in 1915 and now falls under the Dept. of Homeland Security, providing information on maritime and port security, search and rescue, and counter-narcotics.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: Although CGI is technically an intelligence agency, its primary mission is as an investigative arm of the Coast Guard. CGI special agents “conduct criminal, counterintelligence and personnel security investigations within the Coast Guard’s area of responsibility,” with the majority being criminal offenses violating military law, according to the Coast Guard’s official website. However, the Coast Guard does have specialists conducting analysis and collection of intelligence.

Budget: Unknown. Like the Army, the budget has some overlap, although the 2014 budget request includes $60 million for C4ISR systems, an acronym for Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance.

CGI headquarters is relatively small, only employing about 280.

The Treasury’s Office of Intelligence and Analysis collects terrorism and financial intelligence.

The Office of Intelligence and Analysis is fairly new, established in 2004 by the Intelligence Authorization Act. OIA’s focus is mainly on providing information to combat terrorism and illicit financial transactions.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: OIA safeguards the U.S. financial system “against illicit use and combating rogue nations, terrorist facilitators, weapons of mass destruction proliferators, money launderers, drug kingpins, and other national security threats,” according to DNI.

Budget: Around $340 million.

The Drug Enforcement Administration hunts down illegal drugs.

The DEA has been gathering intelligence for anti-drug operations since its establishment in 1973. The agency collects and provides intelligence to other law enforcement agencies and helps with investigations.

Headquarters: El Paso, Texas

Mission: DEA assists local and federal law enforcement in conducting major drug investigations, along with developing “information that leads to seizures and arrests, and provid[ing] policy makers with drug trend information upon which programmatic decisions can be based,” according to their website.

Budget$2 billion (total DEA budget in 2013)

The Marine Corps Intelligence Activity monitors the Corp’s battlefields.

Like Army intelligence, the Marine Corps provides their own agency to collect and analyze information for troops on the ground. This includes map making, radio intercepts, human intelligence, and counter-intelligence.

Headquarters: Quantico, Va.

Mission: The primary function of Marine IA is to give tactical and operational intelligence to battlefield commanders. They also serve as the “go-to” unit for the Commandant of the Marine Corps on understanding intel. 

Budget: Unknown. The total military intelligence budget was $21.5 billion in 2012.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency provides advanced mapping for military forces.

The National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency provides advanced mapping for military forces.

Digital Globe

Having its roots from the 1972 formation of the Defense Mapping Agency and formerly known as NIMA, the agency was renamed the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency in 2003. The agency has the task of collecting and understanding Earth’s physical and man-made attributes. Using advanced imagery (mainly from satellites), it was NGA watching Osama bin Laden’s compound in Pakistan.

Headquarters: Ft. Belvoir, Va.

Mission: NGA employs cartographers and analysts that collect and generate information about the Earth. This data is used in navigation, national security, military operations, and humanitarian aid efforts.

BudgetClassified. NGA employs approximately 14,500 government civilians.

The National Reconnaissance Office is responsible for America’s spy satellites.

The National Reconnaissance Office is responsible for America's spy satellites.

CREDIT: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

While the NGA is responsible for gaining information from satellite data, the National Reconnaissance Office — created secretly in 1961 and not acknowledged until 1992 — is in charge with satellite design, building, launch, and maintenance.

Headquarters: Chantilly, Va.

Mission: NRO gives its mission as “innovative overhead intelligence systems for national security.” Simply put, the NRO provides their “customers” at the CIA, DoD, and elsewhere with technologically advanced spy satellites.

BudgetClassified

The Office of Naval Intelligence provides information on the world’s oceans to sailors everywhere.

The Office of Naval Intelligence was established in 1882 for “the purpose of collecting and recording naval information” that could be useful in war and peace. Like other military intelligence services, ONI gives maritime commanders information they need on foreign forces.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: ONI gathers intelligence and moves it rapidly to decision makers. “We produce maritime intelligence on weapons and technology proliferation and smuggling and illicit maritime activities that directly supports the U.S. Navy, joint war fighters and national decision makers and agencies,” according to their website.

Budget: Unknown. The total military intelligence budget was $21.5 billion in 2012.

The Department of Homeland Security Office of Intelligence and Analysis looks for information on any potential threats to the US.

The DHS Office of Intelligence and Analysis works primarily on homeland threats — collecting and analyzing information, and sharing intelligence with local and federal law enforcement through the use of “fusion centers.”

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: They work on four main areas: understanding threats through analysis, collecting information relevant to homeland security, sharing that information with the agencies that need it, and managing the homeland security enterprise,according to DNI.

Budget: Classified. In a Congressional Research Service report, it was noted that “DNI does not publicly disclose details about the intelligence budget, but … reported that the aggregate amount appropriated to the [national intelligence program] for FY2009 was $49.8 billion.”

 

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence is where all the intelligence should come together for delivery to the president.

The Office of the Director of National Intelligence is where all the intelligence should come together for delivery to the president.

DNI

Established in 2004, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI) manages the efforts of the entire U.S. intelligence community. Director James R. Clapper serves as the principal advisor to the president as well as the National Security and Homeland Security Councils.

Headquarters: Washington, D.C.

Mission: The DNI has two main missions: to lead intelligence integration, and “forge an intelligence community that delivers the most insightful intelligence possible.”

Budget: The specifics of the office itself are unknown, but the total aggregate amount for the national intelligence program is more than $48 billion.

BONUS: The ‘intelligence state’ has been expanding drastically since 9/11.

The U.S. intelligence community is officially made of 17 organizations, but there is even more to the story.

groundbreaking investigation from the Washington Post found some rather daunting figures:

— 1,271 government organizations and 1,931 private companies are working on intelligence, counterterrorism, or homeland security in the U.S.

— Just the NSA alone is contracting with more than 250 companies on intelligence work, including big names like Northrop Grumman and SAIC.

— Many intelligence agencies are doing redundant work, such as 51 federal and military organizations that track the flow of money in and out of terror networks.

— One reason why those intelligence budgets are classified: millions of dollars in so-called “ghost money” given to foreign governments.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/17-agencies-of-the-us-intelligence-community-2013-5?op=1#ixzz2b4GFVAaw

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