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Archive for category India Pollution

India a regional wild bull Asif Haroon Raja

India a regional wild bull

Asif Haroon Raja

India occupies a unique position in the South Asian region by dint of occupying nearly 72 percent of the land surface in South Asia, being a home of 77 percent of the region’s population, and accounting for nearly 75 percent of the regional economic output. It has the third largest Army (1,325,000) in the world and its economy is ranked 10th strongest ($2.0 trillion). Notwithstanding its political, economic and military prowess, India is viewed as a hegemonic power by all her six neighbors – from Bangladesh in the east to Pakistan in the west, from Nepal and Bhutan in the north to Sri Lanka in the south since all the six South Asian States have suffered at the hands of India.

Indian political scientist (late) Dr. Bhabani Sen Gupta wrote in the India Today April 30, 1984, “The Indian elephant cannot transform itself into a mouse. If South Asia is to get itself out of the crippling binds of conflicts and cleavages, the six neighbors will have to accept the bigness of the seventh. And the seventh, that is India, will have to prove to the six that big can indeed be beautiful.” India instead chose to become a wild bull suiting her inner chemistry.

Drunk with power, India would not hesitate to attack a country if it were in her interest to do so and if she felt that the other side was too weak to resist. Indian leaders are staunch followers of infamous Chanakya (author of Arthasastra during Chandragupta rule) and they feel no penitence in implementing the deceitful policies of their Guru to undermine the neighboring countries in pursuit of their geo-economic interests. Believing in the dictum ‘everything is fair in love and war’, they befriend the enemy of the neighbor, carryout false flag operations, create misgivings through propaganda war, anarchy and destabilization through covert operations and put their sins in the basket of others.

RAW is notorious for conducting clandestine operations in the neighborhood. Once India fails to assert its authority through coercion, it then projects itself as the big brother to draw brotherly respect from younger brothers. Its behavior as a big brother however leaves much to be desired. Rather than earning respect by behaving maturely and generously, it behaves arrogantly and expects one-sided respect and concessions. It has believed in the policy of taking all and giving nothing in return. It considers unilateral concessions as its birthright.

By the virtue of its size, economic potential and military power, India claims a regional leadership position for herself, while her South Asian neighbors accuse her of exercising hegemony. Her neighbors that have been repeatedly bitten have reasons to complain. India has frequently resorted to military force in the region and is the initiator of terrorism. It befriended Mukti Bahini in East Pakistan and then treacherously split Pakistan into two in 1971. India ousted the Ranas in Nepal and put King Tribhuvan on the throne in 1950. India pressed him to sign a treaty of peace and friendship that is viewed by many Nepalese politicians as imperialist. India trained the Tamil Tigers to kick-start a rebellion in Sri Lanka in 1983 which raged till 2009. India restored Prime Minister Gayoom’s rule during the attempted military coup in Maldives in 1988. India didn’t spare even Bangladesh which she helped in gaining independence in 1971 and pitched Chakma rebels (Shanti Bahini) against Gen Ziaur Rahman government and subsequent regimes. Hasina Wajid, daughter of Mujibur Rahman is in India’s best books. To please India and hurt Pakistan, she has undertaken farcical trials of aged Jamaat-e-Islami leaders allegedly involved in war crimes during 1971 war and some have been hanged.

 

 

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In terms of forcible seizure and land grab, India has occupied Muslim-majority J&K (October 1947), Muslim-ruled Hyderabad (1948), Portuguese-administered Dadra & Nagar Haveli (1954), and Goa, Diu & Daman (1961), and Buddhist-ruled Sikkim (1975) through a surfeit of vicious and fraudulent means, often discounting people’s wishes. For instance, an opinion poll by CSDS in 2007 showed that 87% of people in the Kashmir Valley didn’t want to live under India. And yet, India, the so-called largest democracy in our world, has no wish to hold such a referendum in the occupied territories.

In violation of the UN Resolutions and pledge given by Nehru, India stubbornly clings to the occupied territory and claim it as integral part of India. In order to retain her illegal occupation, India has stationed 750,000 occupying forces in Indian Occupied Kashmir and has subjected the hapless Kashmiris to a reign of terror. To keep Pakistan restrained from voicing concern and seeking a plebiscite, India waged a massive proxy war in FATA and Balochistan in 2003 which is still continuing and is now resorting to water terrorism. India has water disputes with Bangladesh and Nepal.

The neighbors see India as an overbearing oppressor and a rogue, which uses her territories to dump poor quality Indian goods while putting unnecessary restrictions to exporting their goods into India. SAARC has not progressed essentially because of India’s efforts to set rules of tariffs in accordance with her wishes and to monopolize the trade. All SAARC members trading with India suffer from trade deficit.

India’s policies remain myopic and short-sighted, if not self-centered and often lethal. She has failed to wipe out the pervasive negative perceptions held by all her regional neighbors. So far, from Bhabani Sen Gupta’s utopian view, India has become a regional wild bull, if not an elephant or even worse. And no one likes such a beast! Truly, the stamp of a regional hegemon is written all over India’s face. As a matter of fact with the resurgence of the Hindutva fascist forces in the national politics of India, she has the potential to become a regional pariah. And that is an ominous sign for the entire region! Just as the United States of America and Russia are hated today in many countries globally for their hegemony, so is India in South Asia.

India being an imperialist power and ruled by 2.8% Brahman rulers wants to become super power of South Asia and a world power. This ambition is essentially driven by the myth of Mahabharata, fanaticized by every Brahman. Not only Brahman leaders behave callously towards the neighbors, their behavior towards minorities in India is also atrocious. Muslims, Sikhs, Christians and even low caste Hindus have suffered a great deal at the hands of Hindu extremists. India’s oppressive policies have given birth to dozens of insurgencies.

Indigenous freedom movement in Indian Occupied Kashmir (IOK) has become a bleeding wound for India and a cause of embarrassment that despite deploying such a large force in a small Valley and using excessive force, rape and torture as tools to crush the movement for over 22 years, it has failed to extinguish the flame of liberty. Maintenance of 750,000 security forces since 1989 in IOK is a huge drain on India’s economy. So is the burden of 700,000 troops employed to fighting dozens of insurgencies/separatist movements in various parts of India.

India considers Pakistan as the lone obstacle in the way of her imperialist ambitions. India’s dangerous plan conceived after 9/11 in 2001 to denuclearize and balkanize Pakistan through proxy war has run into difficulties because of NATO’s and ANA’s inability to defeat Afghan Taliban and ISAF’s withdrawal. Increasing intimacy between USA and Pakistan as well as between new Afghan regime and Pakistan is happening at a time when Indo-Pakistan relations are sailing through choppy waters. This change in the outlook of USA trying to remove the distrust accumulated over a period of time and to rebuild friendly ties with Pakistan is vexing India. Not knowing how to disrupt growth of Pak-US and Pak-Afghan ties, India is continuing to play the terrorism card.

After heating up the LoC in Kashmir and working boundary in Sialkot sector together with abortive false flag operations, RAW in concert with elements within Afghan NDS, is using runaway Fazlullah and Khurasani to carryout terror attacks against soft targets inside Pakistan to cause maximum pain. Attack on Army Public School Peshawar was masterminded by RAW. Now targets of similar nature including DHAs and Askari colonies are listed as future targets. Several terror attacks in Balochistan in quick succession are link of the same chain to build up pressure on Pakistan and force the Army to give a breather to the FATA militants and get deflected towards the eastern border. The US must be firmly told to discipline the wild bull if it is serious in getting rid of the scourge of terrorism. At the same time, Pakistan should impress upon other South Asian States that if they desire to live as independent respectable nations and want to progress, they will have to find ways and means how to tame the wild bull.   

The writer is a retired Brig, war veteran/defence analyst/columnist/book writer, Member Executive Council PESS, Director Measac Research Centre, Member Board of Governors TFP.asifharoonraja@gmail.com   

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India’s Election Remakes our World by Martin Wolf, Financial Times

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Excerpt:

 “First, India has shown yet again the signal virtue of democracy: the peaceful transfer of legitimate power. That this is possible in such a vast, diverse and poor country is an inspiring political achievement……

Second, Indians have rejected the dynastic politics of the Congress party, which, alas, brought to a sad end the distinguished public service of Manmohan Singh, a man I have known and admired for four decades……

Third, Mr Modi truly is a self-made man……Indians have chosen a man who promises to improve their lives. He is not chosen for his origins. That is testimony to India’s transformation over the past quarter of a century…..

This election might prove to be a big step towards the economic modernisation of India that was relaunched in 1991. But this round of reforms will also be far harder than those were…..Mr Modi remains an enigma. He is a man of action, a nationalist and a committed member of the Hindutva movement. It is hard to believe he would match Mr Singh’s emollient reaction to Pakistan’s promotion of terrorism. It is impossible to know what he might mean for India’s communal relations. Nobody knows either how far he feels obliged to the business people who funded his campaign

 

The captioned article in today’s FT is excellent and points towards the same issues that our policy makers should be focussing on .

India’s Election Remakes our World

By Martin Wolf

Modi must accelerate economic progress to benefit the vast majority, not just the elites

©Ingram Pinn

An Indian economist, has written to me that India’s recent election is “the most momentous election in world history”. I disagree: the elections of Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Delano Roosevelt were more significant.

But the idea is not absurd. India’s population is 1.27 billion. Soon it will overtake China as the most populous country. If the election of Narendra Modi were to transform India, it would transform the world.

It is already possible to identify at least three ways in which the Indian election is remarkable.

FirstIndia has shown yet again the signal virtue of democracy: the peaceful transfer of legitimate power. That this is possible in such a vast, diverse and poor country is an inspiring political achievement.

Second, Indians have rejected the dynastic politics of the Congress party, which, alas, brought to a sad end the distinguished public service of Manmohan Singh, a man I have known and admired for four decades. The most important Congress-led government since the days of Jawaharlal Nehru was that of Narasimha Rao in the early 1990s, under whom Mr Singh served as reforming finance minister. If Mr Modi succeeds, it will be because he builds on that foundation. Congress still has the best chance of being the strong secular party India needs, but only if it liberates itself from its dependence on the Gandhi family.

ThirdMr Modi truly is a self-made man. Even though his party won just 31 per cent of the vote, he has gained an overwhelming majority in the lower house. He has done so by promising to spread the perceived successes of Gujarat to the rest of the country. There is debate in India over whether Gujarat is the model it is alleged to be. Yet that is not the main point. What matters more is that Indians have chosen a man who promises to improve their lives. He is not chosen for his origins. That is testimony to India’s transformation over the past quarter of a century.

The outgoing government is condemned as a failure. Yet, as Shankar Acharya, former chief economic adviser to the Indian government in the 1990s, points out, “economic growth has averaged 7.5 per cent a year, the fastest in any decade in Indian history. This rapid growth in gross domestic product has raised average income . . . by nearly 75 per cent in real, inflation-adjusted rupees.” This sounds good. But, he adds, it also hides the truth.

Growth slowed sharply over the past three years “because of the cumulation of bad economic policies”, while consumer price inflation has risen to between 9 and 11 per cent over the past five years. At the same time, Mr Acharya says, the government’s policies became steadily worse. He points to exorbitant spending on subsidies for oil, food and fertilisers, wasteful entitlement programmes, exorbitant pay settlements and huge fiscal deficits. Other failures include the refusal to lift disincentives to employment, crony capitalism, capricious regulation, retrospective taxation, excessive jumps in food procurement prices and corruption.

Mr Acharya argues that all this has contributed to a daunting legacy: a failure to create jobs for the 10 million young people entering the job market each year; stagnation in manufacturing; inadequate infrastructure; huge overhangs of incomplete projects; vulnerability of agriculture due to water stress; badly run entitlement programmes; the weakening of the country’s external finances; and further deterioration in the quality of governance itself.

Mr Acharya is a sober analyst of Indian economic realities, who worked closely with Mr Singh in the 1990s. His damning assessment is persuasive. Yet India can surely do better. The latest estimates suggest that GDP per head is just a tenth that of the US, and half that of China. It must be possible for this country to catch up even faster.

Mr Modi has above all been elected to accelerate development. But if one recalls the failure of his Bharatiya Janata party’s “India shining” campaign of a decade ago, he must do so in ways seen to benefit the vast majority of the population, not just its elites.

It is not clear whether Mr Modi can rise to such big challenges in this vast and complex country. His motto – “less government and more governance” – has caught the public mood. Yet it is not clear what this will mean in practice.

An analysis by JPMorgan suggests that in fact “there is a remarkable convergence of broad economic thinking” between the two main parties. The difference, if so, might be more in implementation, an area Mr Modi’s supporters also stress. This suggests that the goods and services tax (a national value added tax) might be put into effect, investment projects might be accelerated, energy prices might be liberalised, shares in public enterprises might be sold – albeit without full privatisation – and fiscal consolidation might be accelerated.

This would be to the good, but probably not enough to bring about the needed acceleration of growth and jobs generation. Vital further reforms would be in employment regulation, education and infrastructure, with a view to making India a base for labour-intensive manufacturing. With Chinese wages rising, this is a plausible ambition. Improvement in the administration of law is crucial. Agriculture needs big advances, including a more modern supply chain. The states need to be forced to compete with one another for people, capital and technology.

This election might prove to be a big step towards the economic modernisation of India that was relaunched in 1991. But this round of reforms will also be far harder than those were. It is not now just a matter of pulling the state out of the way. It is more about making the government an effective and honest servant of the Indian people. This challenge is possibly an order of magnitude more daunting than those Mr Modi once overcame in Gujarat.

Mr Modi remains an enigma. He is a man of action, a nationalist and a committed member of the Hindutva movement. It is hard to believe he would match Mr Singh’s emollient reaction to Pakistan’s promotion of terrorism. It is impossible to know what he might mean for India’s communal relations. Nobody knows either how far he feels obliged to the business people who funded his campaign. But one thing is sure: India has a new game. Pay attention.

 

Read more: http://www.terminalx.org/2010/12/threat-of-hindu-saffron-terror-to-india.html#ixzz32xITqUqU

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REWARDS OF EXTREMISM IN INDIA: HINDU TALIBAN LEADER NARENDRA MODI FROM STREET SWEEPER TO PRIME MINISTER

EXTREMISM PAYS IN INDIA

From Bhangi to Indian PM?


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India complains like a village old woman

India complains like a village old woman

 

Asif Haroon Raja

India being an imperialist power wants to become super power of South Asia and a world power. Mired in dozens of insurgencies it considers Pakistan as the lone stumbling block in the way of her imperialist ambitions. Indigenous freedom movement in Indian Occupied Kashmir (IOK) has become a bleeding wound for India and a cause of embarrassment that despite deploying such a large force in a small Valley and using excessive force, rape and torture as tools to crush the movement for over 22 years, it has failed to extinguish the flame of liberty. Maintenance of 750,000 security forces since 1989 in IOK is a huge drain on India’s economy which is slowing down. So is the burden of 700,000 troops employed for fighting dozens of insurgencies and separatist movements in various parts of India.

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Once India jumped out of the lap of former Soviet Union and slid into the warm lap of USA in 1991, it started working feverishly to create permanent wedge between USA and Pakistan – the two erstwhile allies – by coloring the perceptions of US leaders against Pakistan. India’s main propaganda plank was ‘cross border terrorism by Pakistan in IOK’. 9/11 gave a godsend opportunity to India to restore its lost influence in Afghanistan and to operationalize its plan of destabilizing, denuclearizing, encircling, isolating and balkanizing Pakistan through proxy war using Afghan soil. For the achievement of their common objectives, the Indo-US-Afghan nexus commenced covert war against Pakistan in 2002 with a view to cripple Pakistan economically, politically, socially and militarily.

 

Their sustained efforts have made FATA and Balochistan highly restive and Pakistan’s economy fragile. More the difficulties encountered by Pakistan on account of foreign sponsored insurgencies in the two turbulent regions and disorder in Karachi, more the closeness between the three strategic partners grew. So much so that Indo-Afghan and Afghan-US strategic partnership agreements were signed. At the same time, hostility of the trio against Pakistan also intensified. India was over the moon seeing Pakistan in dire strait and breathlessly waited to use its military instrument to axe it for good. Karzai regime didn’t lag behind in keeping Pakistan in the dock.

 

Not only the Indian political leaders have maintained an aggressive posture against Pakistan, Indian senior military officers also have been flexing muscles to overawe Pakistan, and have been looking for a 1971 like opportunity to strike Pakistan. Apart from offensive deployment of troops along Pakistan’s border in 2001-02 and 2008-09, former Indian Army chiefs Gen Kapoor and Gen V.K. Singh and even the current chief Gen Bikram Singh have been bragging about India’s much hyped Pakistan-specific Cold Start Doctrine, which in Indian military view has nullified Pakistan’s nuclear deterrence. Ex Army chief Gen V.K. Singh had set up a secret intelligence unit called Technical Services Division (TSD) without the knowledge of Ministry of Defence. Purpose was to carryout clandestine operations against officials of Ministry of Defence, IOK and Pakistan. He misused secret funds to destabilize Omar Abdullah’s government in Kashmir and spent Rs 1.19 crore for this purpose.

 

Gen V.K. Singh justified his act in Kashmir on the plea that use of secret funds has been in practice since 1947. He also admitted that the TSD had conducted eight successful missions inside Pakistan. He used his moles for phone tapping, eavesdropping officials of Ministry of Defence. V.K Singh had a tainted tenure and was accused of corruption. He submitted a petition to Ministry of Defence to adjust his date of birth so that he could serve for another ten months in office. When his petition was rejected by Supreme Court, he became a laughing stock. While in uniform he started hobnobbing with BJP leaders and soon after retirement he joined BJP. He attends Narendra Modi’s rallies and BJP is giving full support to him. Modi whose hands are soaked in the blood of Indian Muslims have been tipped as future Prime Minister of India by BJP. His sole forte is to raise the emotions of Hindus against Indian Muslims and Pakistan and make them hysteric.

 

Indian Army under Gen Bikram Singh who took over the reins of Indian Army on May 31, 2012 heated up the Line of Control (LoC) in Kashmir in January 2013 on a false pretext that Pak Army soldiers were involved in beheading of two Indian soldiers on January 8. It led to unprovoked firing by Indian military. After Manmohan Singh’s stern warning to Pakistan, Gen Bikram on January 14, asked his commanders in Kashmir to be aggressive and offensive against Pakistan. He said, “We reserve the right to retaliate at a time and place of our choosing”. In August 2013, yet another drama of killing of five Indian soldiers by Kashmiri Mujahideen backed by Pak Army was cooked up. The incident led to prolonged ceasefire violations in the form of firing and shelling. The guns had not silenced when another stage-managed terrorist attack on a police station and military base in Samba onSeptember 25 was enacted in which a dozen people were killed. This false flag operation was timed with Manmohan Singh’s address to the UN General Assembly Session in New York on 27th and his scheduled meeting with Nawaz Sharif on September 29. LoC was activated at the behest of BJP which wanted to scuttle Manmohan-Nawaz meeting and the peace process.

 

Unprovoked firing by Indian soldiers across the LoC and working boundary in Sialkot Sector in which scores of civilians as well as soldiers and cattle were killed became a daily routine from August to first week of November 2013 till Sartaj Aziz met Manmohan Singh and Indian Foreign Minister Salman in Colombo and both sides agreed to respect 2003 ceasefire agreement. Military coercion and jingoism spearheaded by Indian military-BJP combine are aimed at playing Pakistan card to win next elections in 2014. Indian military and BJP nexus aims at establishing Hindutva in India.   

 

India’s dangerous plan conceived in 2001 to destroy Pakistan has run into difficulties because of NATO’s and ANA’s inability to defeat Afghan Taliban. From 2008 onwards, the wind started to blow against occupying forces because of Taliban’s resurgence. When nothing worked in favor of USA, a stage came when the US was forced by circumstances in 2010 to employ its political prong to induce the Taliban to hold peace dialogue. At the same time, Obama announced that the US-NATO troops would quit Afghanistan by December 2014. This unpalatable step was taken in spite of opposition from Pentagon and CIA as well as from India, Israel and Afghanistan. It dawned upon Obama’s Administration that all the strategic allies on whom the US had leaned heavily had no influence over the Taliban and were ineffectual. On the other hand, Pakistan which was all along seen as part of the problem was the sole country which could help in arranging talks and arriving at a political settlement.

 

Increasing intimacy between USA and Pakistan is happening at a time when Indo-Pakistan relations are sailing through murky waters. This change in the outlook of USA trying to remove the distrust accumulated over a period of time and to rebuild friendly ties with Pakistan is vexing India. Not knowing how to disrupt growth of Pak-US ties, India is continuing to play the terrorism card. During his meeting with Obama in New York in September last, Manmohan Singh had a single point agenda of bad mouthing Pakistan. Throughout the meeting he kept complaining like a village old woman that Pakistan was indulging in cross border terrorism in Kashmir and disturbing the peace. Even during his address to the UN he dubbed Pakistan as epicenter of terrorism. Indian officials are propagating that there is sharp increase in LoC-crossing attempts into IOK which has led to increase in ceasefire violations and resurgence of terrorist attacks against Indian forces in Kashmir. While craving to become a world power, Indian leaders have a bad habit of putting their sins in the basket of Pakistan and then moaning like a village woman that they are the victims of terrorism.          

 

The writer is a retired Brig and a defence analyst. asifharoonraja@gmail.com

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THE GREAT INDIAN AIR FORCE : What IAF thought were Pakistani drones turned out to be migratory birds

What IAF thought were Pakistani drones turned out to be migratory birds

INDIA TODAY ONLINE  NEW DELHI, OCTOBER 20, 2013 | UPDATED 08:31 IST
 
 
 

 

Migratory birds
As the birds’ profile matched that of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Air Force jets persisted with the recci, including surveillance of the local airspace in the area.

Security concerns of the Indian Air Force across the Pakistan border met an unexpected but not-so-pleasant surprise this year. After radar signals indicated that unmanned aircraft were heading toward the Indian territory, the Air Force carried out sorties along the Gujarat border for several weeks this year. 

But the sorties proved futile as the signal would disappear after fighter jets from Jamnagar  would take off, only to reappear once the jets left the area, reported The Sunday Express.

 

Aug 2013:Army reports UFO sightings in Ladakh, again 

After this aerial exercise continued for weeks, IAF flight controllers finally traced the intruders: Large flocks of migratory birds heading for water bodies in Gujarat, flying at high speeds with the help of strong tail winds.

The force, however, was not clear about the species of migratory birds.

A report on the incidents reveals that between December’12 and February’13, radars placed them as “slow-moving tracks of variable heights of 4 to 6 km and variable speed from 100 to 250 kmph”.

As the birds’ profile matched that of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), Air Force jets persisted with the recci, including surveillance of the local airspace in the area, the report says.  

The source of signals was traced to birds when the Air Force contacted the Nalsarovar and Thol bird sanctuaries and authorities said the possible route and flight profile of the tracks matched those of birds migrating to Gujarat.

UFO or Chinese lanterns? ISRO team to visit Leh to solve mystery of flying objects

Now, the IAF will trace migratory patterns and the months in which birds cross over from across the border, the reports adds.

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