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Archive for category Pakistan Navy

Golden Jubilee of Pakistan Navy War College: Reminiscences of a great institution by Admiral(Retd) Ravindra Wijegunaratne, Sri Lankan Navy

 

The Pakistan Navy War College, Lahore, celebrated its 50th anniversary, last month. The Pakistan Navy War course conducted by this prestigious College is ten months long and includes a number of industrial visits, military exercises and a foreign tour. Approximately 70 students, majority of them from the Pakistan Navy and two each from the Pakistan Army and Air Force attend the course besides 10 officers from friendly countries. I followed the 24th course in 1995/96. The College was then located in Karachi and known as ‘Pakistan Navy Staff College’.

Foreign officers and their families were provided with accommodation. I was there with my family. My son was only three-years-old and he started attending Kindergarten while I was following the course.

Pakistan military personnel are very fond of their Sri Lankan counterparts. They always help us. Thanks to a generous stipend from Sri Lanka, we lived very comfortably in Karachi and I had the opportunity to take part in Inter-Staff College sports activities.

Out of the distinguished foreign alumni of the War College, eight officers commanded their navies during the last 50 years—Major General Rowland Leslie Makandu of Tanzania Navy in 1989, Staff Brigadier Khaflan Al Room UAE Navy in 1996, Major General Said Shusan Omary Tanzania Navy in 2006, Staff Major General M Al Muhammad Ahmed UAE Navy in 2005, First Admiral Dato Seri Pahlawan Haji Othman Bin Hj Suhaili Royal Brunei Navy in 2005, Rear Admiral Houssain Khamzadi Islamic Republic of Iran Navy in 2007 and Colonel Hishan Kharkiv Aljarrah Royal Jordanian in Navy 2013.  I became the Commander of the Navy of Sri Lanka in 2015. I am the only foreign alumnus to become a Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) of the Armed Forces. Further, I am the only recipient of the highest medal awarded by Pakistan – Nishan-e-Imtiyaz (Military) medal (Order of Excellence) from the Pakistan President at a special investiture Ceremony in February 2019 in Islamabad.

 I was invited to the celebrations as a guest of the Pakistan Navy Chief.

The Golden Jubilee celebrations commenced with the alumni dinner. The Chief Guest was Admiral Muhammad Amjad Khan Niazi, the Chief of Naval Staff, Pakistan. He has been the Commandant of PN War College.

Seated next to me was a tall, very smart elderly gentleman who introduced him self as “Vice Admiral Tasnim retired from the Pakistan Navy”. During our brief conversation at dinner, he mentioned that he was 86 years old and he  had undergone his basic naval training at Britannia Royal Naval College (BRNC), Dartmouth, UK with “Midshipman Asoka De Silva” in 1950!  I immediately recognised his class.

Old Royalist rugby player Asoka de Silva represented Navy Rugby team as full back. He has commanded ships and craft and served in high positions in Trincomalee, Jaffna and Naval Headquarters. When he was Chief of Staff of our Navy, he encouraged me to join them.

Admiral Asoka de Silva was the 9th Navy Commander of Sri Lanka from 1983 to 1986. His son, Sajith, was one year senior to me at  Royal, and we both were keen scouts. Vice Admiral Tasnim said he had been in PN Staff College serving as Directing Staff member (instructor) and later became the Commandant.

That night with the intention of finding more details about this veteran Pakistan Naval officer, I consulted Google Guru. I keyed in “Vice Admiral Tasnim of Pakistan Navy”. What a surprise!

He and his crew became heroes in the 1971 Indo-Pakistan War. He Commanded Pakistan Navy Submarine PNS Hangor and patrolled the Arabian Sea.

However, naval action was somewhat different. Indian Admirals towed three missile boats by bigger war ships and targeted the Karachi port and fuel tanks there; the port was in flames  for many days.

However, the action of Pakistan Navy Submarine PNS Hangor (S- 131) (nickname Shark) led to the sinking of Indian Navy ASW Frigate on 9 Dec 1971 off the Gujarat coast. It was the first time following the World War ll, a submarine was able to sink a warship!

The then Lt. Commander Ahmad Tasnim was the submarine Commander. It is very difficult for surface ships to detect submarines. Main sensor on surface-and-air warfare does not work underwater as electro-magnetic waves (radar) do not travel through water. Electro-magnetic waves move at the speed of light in air. Therefore, we use sound waves, which, however, have a very limited range.

INS Khukhri Sunk By Pakistan Navy’s  Submarine PNS Hangor

The speed of sound moving through water depends on three factors—pressure (which increases with depth), temperature and salinity. The greater the pressure, the higher the speed. The same is true of temperature and salinity. So, detecting a submarine by using equipment called SONAR is a very difficult task. There are two types of SONARs– active and passive. Active SONARs are the ones that transmit sound waves and enable us to listen to the echo of the target. Passive SONARs are just hydrophones that help us listen to under water sounds. (The present-day Bangladesh Navy Chief (Admiral Sheen Iqbal) and I were Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) specialists, following the same course in 1989/90 at ASW school, Cochin, India.)

During the 1971 war, on 09 December Pakistan Submarine PNS Hangor targeted two Indian Frigates, INS Khukri and INS Kirpan . INS Khukri was sunk with two torpedoes whereas INS Kirpan survived the attack. The Captain of the sinking Indian Ship Khukri, Captain Mahendra Nath Mullar decided to go down with the ship following the tradition of seafarers. He was awarded with second highest gallantry medal of India, Maha Vir Chakra (MVC) posthumously. INS Khukri is the only ship Indian Navy has lost in battle to date. Eighteen officers and 176 sailors of Indian Navy died in this attack. Only 64 survived.

There is so much to learn from sea battles. The Sri Lanka Navy also should also build up a small submarine unit as Bangladesh and Myanmar have done.

Edited Version 

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Pakistan, Turkey Tighten Ties With First Corvette Launch The PNS Babur is the first of four corvettes being built for the Pakistani Navy by Turkish shipbuilders.

The Turkish-made Pakistani frigate Babur launches earlier this month. (Turkish MoD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pakistan, Turkey Tighten Ties With First Corvette Launch The PNS Babur is the first of four corvettes being built for the Pakistani Navy by Turkish shipbuilders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AUCKLAND: The Aug. 15 launch of its new PNS Babur corvette from a Turkish shipyard marks a major step in a wide modernization effort underway for Pakistan’s Navy (PN).

Under a 2018 contract between Islamabad and Ankara, the PN will receive four new extra-large variants of the 99m-long, 2,000t Turkish Ada-class (MILGEM) corvettes, also known as the Jinnah-class. Babur — expected to be delivered and enter service with the PN in 2023 — is the first of two that are being built at Istanbul Shipyard, which already cut steel for its second ship on May 1, 2021.

The second pair are being built in Pakistan at the Karachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Work (KSEW) shipyard under a technology transfer agreement. KSEW cut steel for its first MILGEM corvette in Oct. 2020 and it is expected to be delivered in early 2024. Delivery for all four ships are due to be completed by 2025.

Details of the equipment on the MILGEM corvettes has not been disclosed, but it will have new anti-air, anti-ship and anti-submarine weapons, sensors and C2 systems as well as the LM2500 gas turbine — making it one of Pakistan’s most modern vessels.

In its press release, the Turkish MoD announced that the construction of the ship represents a deepening of the ties between Turkey and Pakistan. It follows a two-day visit by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to Islamabad in February, signifying a further strengthening of the bilateral relationship. The two Muslim countries have cooperated closely on counter-terrorism as well as defense technology. They routinely support each other on the international stage and are expected move beyond defense to enhance economic links in the future.

The corvette deal also highlights the coming of age of Turkish military shipbuilding, which has expanded dramatically over the past decade both domestically and as a growing presence on the export markets. It was announced in Dec. 2020 that Istanbul Shipyards has secured a contract from Ukraine worth just over $1 billion to deliver four MILGEM corvettes from 2026-28 to re-capitalize the Ukrainian Navy.

Pakistan has cast a wide net as it attempts a wholesale renewal of its naval power. The PN found it was limited in the contribution it could make to the international counter-piracy efforts that were established during the mid-2000s in the Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa — Pakistan’s backyard — and as a result began a major modernization program.

The first step came with the introduction of the earlier Zulfiquar-class (F-22P) frigates built by China’s Hudong-Zhonghua and KSEW, which commissioned between 2008 and 2013. But the PN still needs to reinforce and replace its older ex-UK and US Navy frigates, as well as respond to the expansion of Indian naval power that followed the terrorist attack on Mumbai in 2008 and Delhi’s own rivalry with Beijing in the Indian Ocean.

Islamabad is now under contract for four 134m-long Type 054A/P frigates from Hudong-Zhonghua shipyard, with the third launching earlier in the month — another military industrial tie to a key political partner.
The PN stated that the Chinese frigates will have the latest surface, subsurface and anti-air weapon systems and will also be fitted with “a range of electronic warfare, air and surface surveillance and acoustic sensors.”

This is expected to include a vertical launch system for surface-to-air missiles. The order for the four frigates was placed in 2017 and the first ship was launched in August 2020, with the second following in January 2021.

The MILGEM corvettes and Type 054 frigates will join the two Yarmook-class corvettes that entered PN service in 2020. The Yarmooks were built by Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in the Netherlands following an order in 2017.

The Yarmook-class corvettes are based on the company’s 91.3m-long 2,300t OPV 1900 design but are fitted with anti-air, anti-submarine, electronic warfare and point defense systems. Introduction of the Yarmook-class, with its medium helicopter and two rigid hull inflatable boats, has sparked a renaissance in the PN’s capabilities.

MILGEM CORVETTES

Milgem Class corvettes are being built for the Turkish Navy under the Turkish national warship programme known as Milgem. Eight corvettes and four F-100 Class frigates will be constructed under the programme. The new Milgem Class multimission corvettes feature stealth technologies and can perform search, rescue, patrol, observation and anti-submarine warfare operations.

The keel was laid for the first vessel, TCG Heybeliada (F-511), at the Istanbul Naval Shipyard in July 2005. Launched in September 2008, the vessel was scheduled to commission in early 2011. The second vessel in class, TCG Büyükada (F-512), was laid in September 2008. It is scheduled to be launched in October 2010 and commissioned in 2013.

The first two vessels were built at the Istanbul Naval Shipyard Command and remaining vessels will be constructed at private Turkish shipyards. Turkey-based STM has appointed by the Undersecretariat for Defence Industries (SSM) to procure materials, services and systems for the project.

The Canadian Navy, Pakistani Navy, Ukrainian Navy and navies of South American countries have evinced interest in Milgem class warships.

The Milgem corvette has an overall length of 99m, a waterline length of 90.5m, a beam of 14.4m and a design draft of 3.6m. The displacement of the vessel is 2,000t. The ship can be fully operated at the sea state 5. It can accommodate 93 crew members, including the air crew.

Milgem corvette design

Milgem Project Office (MPO) designed and developed the vessel platform. Milgem’s design concept and mission profile is similar to the littoral combat ship (LCS-1) developed by Lockheed Martin. It features a steel hull and fragmentation resistant composite superstructure. The stealth hull design achieves low radar, magnetic, infrared and acoustic signatures.

Milgem corvette missions

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China targets export market with latest submarine designs Kelvin Wong – Jane’s International Defence Review

China targets export market with latest submarine designs

Kelvin Wong – Jane’s International Defence Review

Key Points

  • Buoyed by recent successes with the Pakistan and Thai navies, Chinese naval shipbuilder China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation has recently unveiled a slew of new submarine concepts targeted at the export market
  • New export concepts include 200-, 600-, and 1,100-tonne diesel-electric submarines

With decades of experience from submarine design and construction for the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN), Chinese naval developers – led by the state-owned China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) – are looking to expand their presence on the world stage with indigenous export submarine designs having secured recent successes in Pakistan and Thailand.

Pakistan is acquiring eight S20 diesel-electric submarines based on the Yuan-class (Type 039A-series) design, with the first four boats to be built in China and deliveries commencing to the Pakistani Navy (PN) from 2022. The remainder will be built in Pakistan by the Karachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Works (KSEW).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, the Royal Thai Navy (RTN) signed a contract worth THB13.5 billion (USD390 million) with China Shipbuilding and Offshore International Corporation (CSOC), the international trading arm of CSIC, for the delivery of a S26T diesel-electric submarine, an export variant derived from “the most advanced version” of the Yuan-class platform – the Type 039B/041 – in 2023. The service is expected to order two more S26T submarines in the next few years with the aim of operationalising all three boats by 2026. The entire programme would be worth THB36 billion if the follow-on order materialises.

“Drawing upon 60 years of submarine design and construction beginning with the Romeo-, Ming-, Song-, and the Yuan-class, China is capable of independent submarine research and development, including design and construction of submarine platforms and a full range of associated equipment, sensors, and weapons,” a spokesperson of CSOC told Jane’s .

Export submarines

 

According to CSIC, the S20 and S26T platforms are fully indigenous designs that leverage the company’s experience from developing the Yuan-class submarines, which were first launched at its Wuchang Shipyard in Wuhan in May 2004.

Want to read more? For analysis on this article and access to all our insight content, please enquire about our subscription options at ihs.com/contact

 

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Pakistan Navy successfully test-fires new anti ship missile: Story of Ababeel

Pakistan Navy said on Thursday it conducted a successful test of a new land-based anti-ship missile, bolstering its operational reach to launch long- range, anti-ship missiles from land.

The trial of the missile was conducted from the coastal region and the missile secured a hit on a target placed at sea, a press release from the Navy said.

The missile is equipped with advanced technology and avionics, which enable engagement of targets at sea with a high degree of accuracy.

However, the navy did not give more details, including the name of the new missile.

The test-launch was witnessed by vice chief of naval staff Admiral Khan Hasham Bin Saddique and senior officers of Pakistan Navy.

 

Admiral Saddique commended the accomplishment of the objectives of the trial, the release said.

Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Muhammad Zakaullah in his message said that the weapon system has added a new dimension to the operational reach of Pakistan Navy, allowing it to bolster seaward defenses by giving the Navy the capability to launch long-range, anti-ship missiles from land.

 

 

Pakistan on Tuesday conducted a successful test flight of the Ababeel surface-to-surface ballistic missile (SSM), the Inter-Services Public Relations (ISPR) said in a statement.

Ababeel has a maximum range of 2,200 kilometers and is capable of delivering multiple warheads using Multiple Independent Re-entry Vehicle (MIRV) technology, an ISPR press release added.

“The test flight was aimed at validating the various design and technical parameters of the weapon system,” it said.

Ababeel is capable of carrying nuclear warheads and has the capability to engage multiple targets with high precision, defeating hostile radars, the ISPR elaborated.

Surface-to-surface Ababeel ballistic missile. -AFP
Surface-to-surface Ababeel ballistic missile. -AFP

“The development of the Ababeel weapon system was aimed at ensuring survivability of Pakistan’s ballistic missiles in the growing regional Ballistic Missile Defence (BMD) environment,” read the press release.

The Ababeel test came on the heels of a successful test of submarine-launched cruise missile Babur-III earlier this month.

“The successful attainment of a second strike capability by Pakistan represents a major scientific milestone; it is a manifestation of the strategy of measured response to nuclear strategies and postures being adopted in Pakistan’s neighborhood,” the military had said after the Babur-III test.

The missile, launched from an undisclosed location in the Indian Ocean from an underwater, mobile platform, had hit its target with precise accuracy, the Army had said.

Babur-III is a sea-based variant of ground-launched cruise missile Babur-II, which was successfully tested in December last year.

 

On January 24, Pakistan had test-fired 2,200-km range indigenously-developed surface to surface nuclear-capable missile Ababeel. The missile is capable of delivering multiple warheads, using Multiple Independent Re-entry Vehicle (MIRV) technologies.

The Ababeel test flight was aimed at validating the various design and technical parameters of the weapon system.

During the same month, submarine-launched cruise missile Babur-III was successfully test-fired. Babur weapons system incorporates advanced aerodynamics and avionics that can strike targets both at land and sea with high accuracy at a range of 700km.

Babur-III is a low flying, terrain hugging missile, which carries certain stealth features and is capable of carrying various types of warheads

References

Hindustan Times

DAWN

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Naval Feet of 36 Nations Begin Naval Exercise “AMAN 2017” By Pakistan Army Channel

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KARACHI: Naval platforms of nine participating countries arrived here Thursday to participate in Multinational Naval Exercise AMAN 2017 organized by Pakistan Navy.

The exercise will be held from February 10-14.

Over 36 countries are participating in the exercise, which will help in enhancing interoperability with regional and extra-regional navies thereby acting as a bridge between the regions.

It will also project a positive image of Pakistan as a country contributing towards regional peace and stability, said a press released here Thursday.

Being held since 2007, AMAN 17 is 5the edition of this series of Multinational Exercises.

Upon arrival, the visiting ships were given a warm welcome by Senior Pakistan Navy Officials while catchy tunes of National Songs played by PN Band. Officials of the consulates of the respective countries also present in the reception.

Participation details; of different countries are as follows:

1. USA Navy has participated in AMAN 09, AMAN 11 with naval assets and Special Operation Forces during AMAN 07. This year, USA Navy is participating with 04 Naval ships namely USS AMELIA EARHART, USCGS MAUI, USCGSAQUIDNEK and USS TYPHOON.

2. Chinese (PLA) Navy has been an active participant in all AMAN exercises. It has participated in AMAN 07, AMAN 11 and AMAN 13 with naval assets whereas in AMAN 09 it participated with Special Operation Forces team. In AMAN 17, Chinese Navy is participating with 03 ships namely HARBIN DDG 112, HANDAN FFG 575 and DONGPHINGU AO 960 with Senior Capt. Bai Yaoping it’s Mission Commander.

3. Russian Navy is participating in this series of exercises for the very first time with 03 ships namely SEVEROMORSK, ALTAY Tugboat, and DUBNA tanker. Its Special Operations, Forces are also part of this exercise. The Russian contingent’s mission commander is Capt. Stanislav R VARIK.

4. Japanese Navy is participating for the 4th time in this series of exercises with their 02 P3C Orian aircraft led by Commander Daigo Tsubokura.

5. Australian Navy is also participating for the 4th time in this exercise with naval assets.

This year .its ship HMAS ARUNTA is arriving to participate in the exercise led by Commander Cameron Steil, Ran.

6. Indonesian Navy is participating in this series of exercises for the 2nd time. It has earlier participated in AMAN 09. Indonesian Navy ship KRI SULTAN ISKANDARMUDA is led by Commander Rio Henry Muko Yumm as its Mission Commander.

7. Turkish Navy has participated in previous exercises with their Special Operation Forces teams. Turkish Navy is taking part in the exercise for the first time with Ships. Turkish ship TCG GELIBOLU is commanded by Commander Ali Tuna Baysal.

8. Sri Lankan Navy is participating for the 2nd time with its assets. Earlier, they have participated in AMAN 13. Sri Lankan Navy Ship SLS SAMUDRA is commanded by Capt. JP Premaratne.

9. Royal British Navy has participated previously in AMAN 07, AMAN 09 and AMAN 13.This is their 4th participation in this series of exercises. HMS DARING will join the exercise this year commanded by Commander M J C Hember Mam. The Mission Commander from Royal British Navy is AVM Ed Stringer.

During this exercise, participating units will rehearse various naval operations to enhance interoperability. The aim of this multinational ship’s exercise is to display united resolve against terrorism and crimes in the maritime domain.

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