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Archive for December, 2017

Judicial Reforms by Col. Riaz Jafri (Retd)

LETTER TO EDITOR

December 18th, 2017

Judicial Reforms

 

Col. Riaz Jafri (Retd)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The CJP Mian Saqib Nisar addressing a Pakistan Bar Council seminar on Saturday December 16, 2017 sought their cooperation in carrying out the judicial reforms to ensure expeditious justice to the people.  Citing the cases pending in the courts like the one of a widow deprived of her family pension for 15 years or quite a many litigations going on and on for decades for a disputed land or property, the CJP asked the lawyers if that was the kind of justice that the bar and the bench was dispensing to the pitiful masses?  He passionately solicited their considered suggestions and proposals to improve this dismal state of affairs. 

 

 

It is very encouraging to see such concerns about the speedy dispensation of justice expressed at such a high level and I wish them Godspeed in their undertakings. 

 

Kindly allow me to say that I have yet to see a lawyer refusing the brief of a KNOWN culprit. Don’t the lawyers promote crime by defending someone whom they know for definite to have committed the offence and yet try to let him go scot-free? Not only that, the “smart” lawyers then brag about the ‘hidden’ legal lacunae that they found in the proceedings and the hairsplitting of the legalities that they indulged in to confound the issue further to the advantage of their client!  

 

If the lawyers stop defending a known culprit or stop defending an accused any further the moment they come to know of his/her being the actual culprit, I think the crime rate could go down manifold.

 

Could the Bar and the Bench also give it a thought?

 

Col. Riaz Jafri (Retd)
30 Westridge 1
Rawalpindi 46000
Pakistan
E.mail: jafri@rifiela.com

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    India Influences International Entities to Defame Pakistan By Sajjad Shaukat

                            

India Influences International Entities to Defame Pakistan

By Sajjad Shaukat

 

 

Being the only nuclear country in the Islamic World, Pakistan was already on the hit-list of the US-led India and Israel, including some Western countries. But, after the shift of the Great Game from Central Asia to Pakistan’s province of Balochistan, American CIA, Indian RAW and Israeli Mossad, including British MI6 have been supporting target killings, suicide attacks, hostage-takings, sectarian and ethnic violence in various cities of the country, while backing separatist elements in Balochistan and Gilgit-Baltistan provinces. As part of the double game, based in Afghanistan, these secret agencies which have well-established their covert networks there and are well-penetrated in the terrorist outfits like the Islamic State group (Also known as Daesh, ISIS, ISIL), Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and their affiliated Taliban groups are using their terrorists to destabilize Tibetan regions of China, Iranian Sistan-Baluchistan and Pakistan’s Balochistan by arranging the subversive activities. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

While, Pakistan’s Armed Forces have successfully broken the backbone of the foreign-backed terrorists by the military operations Zarb-e-Azb and Radd-ul-Fasaad which have also been extended to other parts of the country, including Balochistan province and Karachi. Army and top intelligence agency ISI have broken the network of these terrorist groups by capturing several militants, while thwarting a number of terror attempts. Peace has been restored in various regions of Pakistan, including Karachi and Balochistan.

 

But, these foreign elements have, again, started terror attacks in Balochistan and other regions of the country which show that the US-led India, Afghanistan and Israel want to weaken Pakistan and to damage the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC).

 

Overtly, American high officials remark that they seek stability in Pakistan, but covertly, they continue to destabilize it, especially with the assistance of India.

 

In this respect, terror attacks coincide with a continued propaganda campaign against Pakistan. Indian lobbies which are well-penetrated in the US administration and Europe, research centers, think tanks, universities, so-called human rights groups and media leave no stone unturned in continuing their endless propaganda to defame Pakistan internationally. Particularly, RAW is availing the opportunity of the US-led organized propaganda campaign against Pakistan.

 

In this regard, a meeting between the Foreign Ministers of the US, Japan and India was held at Palace Hotel, New York on September 18, 2017 on the sidelines of 72nd session of United Nations General Assembly. During the meeting, North Korean nuclear programme was deliberated. Indian External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj has subsequently issued a statement on the meeting containing usual propaganda against Pakistan by hinting that the North Korean proliferation may be linked with Pakistan.

 

Similarly, as part of the propaganda to distort the image of Pakistan abroad, on September 11, 2017, the German public broadcaster Deutsche Welle also published an article titled “Muslim Hypocrisy over the Rohingya”, which stated that Jihadi forces attacking Myanmar’s security forces on August 25, 2017 had links with Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Afghanistan and were being funded by Pakistan and Afghanistan. It has been intentionally propagated under Indian influence in order to link Pakistan with Myanmar’s so called ‘militants’.

 

It is notable that North Korea remained under clouds of nuclear threat from the US throughout the Korean War (1950-1953), North Korea’s ruler Kim Il Sung and his son—Kim Jong-un (Now in power) have been attempting to acquire nuclear weapons’ of their own. North Korea tried its best to acquire nuclear weapons technology from its wartime ally China. Supreme Leader Kim II-Sung twice requested Chinese sovereign Mao Zedong for help, but was declined. Having been denied an easy path to a nuclear bomb, North Korea started an indigenous nuclear weapons program immediately after the war in early 1950s. Hence, to shift the blame game towards Islamabad for North Korean nuclear proliferation is unjustified and unfair. Pakistan’s nuclear programme started much later after the first Indian nuclear test at Pokhran in 1974. During the 1970’s Pakistan’s nuclear programme was not even in its embryonic stage when North Korea had already networked with the West to achieve the capability.

 

In the 70’s and 80’s, North Korea set about acquiring sensitive nuclear technologies from Europe, taking advantage of the lack of adequate nuclear information safeguards at that time. Reportedly they had successful headway in Plutonium based technology on which they based their nuclear programme. Logically and sensibly, Pakistan cannot contribute to the nuclear programme of North Korea which is based on the extraction of Plutonium rather than the Pakistan nuclear programme based on Uranium Centrifugation process.

 

Besides, the Soviets also helped North Korea in setting up its first nuclear reactor in 1964.

 

India, during the current regime of Modi has made it a routine to label Pakistan for any wrong doings happening in and around. Sushma Swaraj has been capitalizing well on this philosophy. The world should realize that the same recipe by Indians on Pakistan cannot work forever.

 

As regards the Royingya crisis, Myanmar’s 1948 citizenship law stripped Rohingya of Myanmar citizenship. The law was orchestrated during military regime. Until recently, Rohingya were registered as temporary residents with identification cards, known as white cards.

 

Buddhist Myanmar government fears speedy population rise among Rohingya Muslims as compared to slow population growth among the Buddhists that may turn into Rohingya majority in the country.

 

In 2014, after holding an UN-backed national census, first in thirty years, Rohingya Muslims could only be registered as Bengalis. Constitutional referendum in 2015 canceled even the temporary identity cards issued to this community.

 

The Myanmar government put restrictions on marriage, family planning (Only allowed to have two children), employment, education, religious choice and freedom of movement.

 

As if, Indian atrocities on hapless Muslims of Indian Occupied Kashmir and other minorities elsewhere were not enough, India has decided to support the repressive regime of Myanmar, which is wreaking havoc on the Rohingya Muslim community.

The Modi regime’s plan to deport 40,000 Rohingya Muslims is underway in the pretext that it had evidence of terror connections between Indian-based Rohingya Muslims and extremist groups allegedly from Pakistan and other Muslim states.

 

In this connection, the sad plight of the Rohingya has provided the Indians a usual and typical blunt instrument to beat Pakistan with and propagate that the Pakistanis are training jihadists in Myanmar and terrorizing the “peace loving Buddhists” of Myanmar. Taking the advantage of the situation, the well beaten rhetoric of Lashkar-e-Tayyaba’s involvement is being propagated across the world.

 

Undoubtedly, New Delhi leaves no stone unturned in associating Pakistan with all international crises like North Korea’s nuclear programme and Myanmar’s Rohingya’s killings in a bid to tarnish Pakistan’s image and negatively influencing international public opinion on Pakistan.

 

Again, it is mentionable that the German public broadcaster–Deutsche Welle seems to have conceded to Indian propaganda, as its reporting has been reduced to only negative news about Islamabad.

 

While, Pakistan’s energies are focused on eradicating terrorism, which are evident due to its concrete actions against terrorism and are being appreciated across the world at different forums. But, India has continued influencing international entities to defame Pakistan in the comity of nations.

 

 

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Wishing Death to the Dead – Hassan Nisar

Murdon Ke Lye Mout Ki Dua By Hassan Nisar (Dated: 08 October 2017)Inline image

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Has Caste Discrimination Followed Indians Overseas? by Priyanka Mogul

Has Caste Discrimination Followed Indians Overseas?

Has Caste Discrimination Followed Indians Overseas?

by

Priyanka Mogul

diplomat.com

 

“One is of the opinion that you leave behind all the trappings of the caste system once you leave India, but perhaps I was naive.”

Saunvedan Aparanti, an Indian student studying in London, has found himself at the center of a heated campaign to introduce caste discrimination legislation in the United Kingdom. Having moved to Britain for university, Aparanti was surprised to find himself at the receiving end of “caste supremacy” from his new flatmates. The caste system he speaks of — and its trappings — is one that the world has, unfortunately, become familiar with. Stories relating to caste violence frequently emerge from some South Asian countries, particularly India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Nepal. Headlines featuring the rape and murder of so-called “lower caste” people, or Dalits, are no longer rare.

Everyone is in agreement that this mistreatment of people based on an ancient social hierarchy is horrific and that it must be combatted. But when Indians say caste discrimination has followed them overseas, the solution doesn’t appear as straightforward anymore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Across the UK, a fierce debate has been playing out within the British-Indian community over whether there is a need to introduce legislation for caste discrimination. In 2011, the employment tribunal heard its first claim of caste discrimination when a couple alleged they had been wrongfully dismissed by their employers because of their inter-caste marriage. Vijay Begraj claimed he was told by a “higher caste” colleague that he was lucky to be working in a law firm as his caste would have made him a cleaner in India. The tribunal also heard that Begraj had been assaulted by relatives of one of the firm’s partners and had been called derogatory caste names. The law firm in question, Heer Manak, denied the allegations until the case was ultimately abandoned in 2013.

Stories such as Begraj’s have united Dalit rights campaigners in the U.K. in the fight for caste law. Caste Watch UK, the Dalit Solidarity Network UK, and the Anti-Caste Discrimination Alliance are a few who have taken center stage in the campaign, with support from a number of academics. The United Nations has also lent a voice to the debate, urging the UK government to implement caste discrimination law.

Manifestations of Caste in the UK

So who is experiencing caste discrimination in the UK? And where and how are they experiencing it?

Numerous reports have been put together, each compiling a number of U.K.-based case studies of caste discrimination. Due to the stigma that comes along with being a “lower caste” person, many are afraid to speak out publicly. Instead, they choose to isolate themselves from the Indian community in the UK and live among non-Indians who have little understanding of caste dynamics.

Research conducted by the National Institute of Economic and Social Research and the Equality and Human Rights Commission has detailed various incidents of caste discrimination in the UK. The majority of these appear to occur in the personal sphere, which falls outside the reach of the Equality Act 2010, which relates to education, employment, and provision of goods and services. This has led some to question whether the implementation of caste under the Equality Act would do very much to combat instances of discrimination among social circles.

However, Dr. Meena Dhanda, a leading academic in diaspora Dalit studies, has noted that there is crossover between what happens in the private and public spheres. She argues that if prejudice exists, it cannot always be assumed that this prejudice does not cross over into the areas of employment and education.

Reena Jaisiah, a young woman of Dalit ancestry, illustrates how this crossover is possible. Her experience saw her become the victim of caste discrimination on the school playground, where students would bully her and call her derogatory names relating to her caste. This then carried on into her adult life, when she was running her shop and found that an elderly “upper caste” woman consistently refused to put money in her hand, instead placing it on the counter.

“That is exercising untouchability here in the U.K.,” Jaisiah said in Caste Aside, a documentary that sees her recount her life as a “lower caste” woman in Britain. Jaisiah’s experience doesn’t appear to be an isolated one, with caste rights groups such as the Dalit Solidarity Network UK and Caste Watch UK noting that they receive calls from people across Britain who say they too have become victims of caste discrimination.

“This is a rights issue that’s happening across South Asia,” said Meena Varma, director of Dalit Solidarity Network UK. “In fact it’s happening globally, because wherever the diaspora go, they take their caste with them, and so, therefore, that discrimination goes with them.”

Arguments Against Caste Legislation

However, not everyone in the British-Indian community believes that caste legislation is necessary in the U.K. The Hindu Council UK and the National Council of Hindu Temples UK have both opposed the calls for caste legislation, with politicians such as MP Bob Blackman backing them.

“Caste legislation simply doesn’t stand ground,” said Anil Bhanot, director of interfaith relations at the Hindu Council UK. “Dalits have become rich now here because there’s no discrimination.”

Bhanot goes on to note that the instances of caste discrimination that have been brought up so far relate to prejudice within social circles, rather than discrimination that would fall under the realm of equality law. He also argued that implementing this legislation will make caste more prominent among British-Indians, bringing awareness of caste where he says there is currently none.

Satish Sharma, general secretary of the National Council of Hindu Temples UK, takes a similar perspective on the legislation. When asked to characterize the Hindu community in the UK, Sharma commended the “harmonious” nature of the community and emphasized that the current generation of British-Hindus have been free from the understandings of the caste system and do not discriminate against each other in any way. He fears that this legislation, if implemented, will automatically presume certain members of the community — anyone who isn’t a Dalit — are “prejudiced by birth.” He strongly opposed this notion and restated his belief that caste is not an aspect of the Hindu religion. Instead, he argues, caste, as it exists today, is a Euro-Christian concept imposed on Indian people.

“Where does this notion that there is some sort of superiority being played out in the British-Hindu community come from?” Sharma questioned. “It’s purely an act of mischief. And if that isn’t a recipe for friction, then I don’t know what is.”

What Happens Next

On September 18, the British government ended a public consultation on caste and equality law in Great Britain, which invited the public to submit their views on “how to ensure that there is appropriate and proportionate legal protection” against caste discrimination. Groups on both sides of the debate rallied supporters to submit their thoughts on the issue.

Sat Pal Muman, Chairman of Caste Watch UK, has hit back at those opposing the legislation, saying: “They are afraid that if caste discrimination law does kick in, somehow it will affect their religion. They may have something to hide, there may be some skeletons in their cupboard.”

As the debate continues, campaigners are hoping that a decision will be made on the legislation in early 2018. Hindus groups remain concerned that bringing caste into U.K. law will send a message that caste is becoming a prominent feature in British-Indian society; something that they believe is far from true. Meanwhile, Dalit rights groups remain anxious about what will happen to the thousands of caste discrimination victims they say they know in the UK.

Future cohesion of the British-Indian community hangs in the balance as the UK government mulls its next move.

Priyanka Mogul is a freelance journalist based in London. She is the producer of Caste Aside, a documentary about the British government’s controversial decision to introduce legislation against caste discrimination in the U.K.

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China targets export market with latest submarine designs Kelvin Wong – Jane’s International Defence Review

China targets export market with latest submarine designs

Kelvin Wong – Jane’s International Defence Review

Key Points

  • Buoyed by recent successes with the Pakistan and Thai navies, Chinese naval shipbuilder China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation has recently unveiled a slew of new submarine concepts targeted at the export market
  • New export concepts include 200-, 600-, and 1,100-tonne diesel-electric submarines

With decades of experience from submarine design and construction for the People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN), Chinese naval developers – led by the state-owned China Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (CSIC) – are looking to expand their presence on the world stage with indigenous export submarine designs having secured recent successes in Pakistan and Thailand.

Pakistan is acquiring eight S20 diesel-electric submarines based on the Yuan-class (Type 039A-series) design, with the first four boats to be built in China and deliveries commencing to the Pakistani Navy (PN) from 2022. The remainder will be built in Pakistan by the Karachi Shipbuilding and Engineering Works (KSEW).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Meanwhile, the Royal Thai Navy (RTN) signed a contract worth THB13.5 billion (USD390 million) with China Shipbuilding and Offshore International Corporation (CSOC), the international trading arm of CSIC, for the delivery of a S26T diesel-electric submarine, an export variant derived from “the most advanced version” of the Yuan-class platform – the Type 039B/041 – in 2023. The service is expected to order two more S26T submarines in the next few years with the aim of operationalising all three boats by 2026. The entire programme would be worth THB36 billion if the follow-on order materialises.

“Drawing upon 60 years of submarine design and construction beginning with the Romeo-, Ming-, Song-, and the Yuan-class, China is capable of independent submarine research and development, including design and construction of submarine platforms and a full range of associated equipment, sensors, and weapons,” a spokesperson of CSOC told Jane’s .

Export submarines

 

According to CSIC, the S20 and S26T platforms are fully indigenous designs that leverage the company’s experience from developing the Yuan-class submarines, which were first launched at its Wuchang Shipyard in Wuhan in May 2004.

Want to read more? For analysis on this article and access to all our insight content, please enquire about our subscription options at ihs.com/contact

 

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